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A draft slammed the door [shut] behind me and I freaked out, thinking it was gunfire.

Are there any mistakes?

Is shut needed?

Thanks!
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Comments  
New2grammar,

What do you mean by "a draft"?
"Shut" wouldn't be necessary.
"A gunshot" would be fine instead of "gunfire."
its correct
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A draft is wind in an enclosed area.

I'm afraid slam and slam shut have different meanings. Is it possible that slam can mean the door hit the wall, therefore, didn't shut?

Why is gunshot preferred over gunfire?

Thanks in advance!
New2grammar,
Thank you for the reply.

"Gunfire" would be okay, and "a gunshot" would be okay, too.
I don't see any difference between "to slam a door" and "to slam a door shut."
Takoyaki, I should be the one thanking Emotion: smile

Do you interpret gunfire as multiple individual gunshots? I would like to know the difference. Is it like bombing vs explosion where bombing is multiple explosions of bombs?

Can someone else confirm slam vs slam shut? It bothers me.
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New2grammar,

> Do you interpret gunfire as multiple individual gunshots?
Yes, because "gunfire" means "the repeated firing of guns; the sound of guns firing."

> Is it like bombing vs explosion where bombing is multiple explosions of bombs?
No. "Gunfire" is an uncountable noun, but "bombing" is a countable/uncountable noun.
Hi New2grammar

The following shows the difference.

slam shut: close violently (Example: "He slammed the door shut")


shut: To move (a door or lid, for example) so as to block passage through an opening.
My question is going to sound really dumb.

Shut means close if I understand the definition correctly. So without shut, the door moves violently but may not end up closed, am I right?
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