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Dear,

I know that the sentence: "The angry boy ran out of the room slamming the door as he went" is correct, but I cannot explain why. And, in the sentence: "The angry boy ran out of the room and slamming/slammed the door as he went", which word should I use, slamming or slammed?
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Hi,

I know that the sentence: "The angry boy ran out of the room slamming the door as he went" is correct, but I cannot explain why.

'Slamming' is used here as an adjective describing the boy. Think of 'a galloping horse'. What you are really talking about here is 'a slamming boy', not 'a slammed boy'.

I'd put a comma before 'slamming' in your sentence.

And, in the sentence: "The angry boy ran out of the room and slamming/slammed the door as he went", which word should I use, slamming or slammed?

Here, you are joining to separate clauses with 'and'. Each needs its own verb, in the past tense. What you are saying is The angry boy ran out of the room and he slammed the door as he went.

Best wishes, Clive

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Thank Clive.

By the way, I want to ask another question about the using of adj.

In the following sentence: "Working on the car made her hands .........", should I use greased or greasy?
Hi,

Say 'greasy hands'. Usually, something is 'greased' for a purpose, eg a greased moving-part in a machine.

Clive
I know that the sentence: "The angry boy ran out of the room slamming the door as he went" is correct, but I cannot explain why. And, in the sentence: "The angry boy ran out of the room and slamming/slammed the door as he went", which word should I use, slamming or slammed?..you may also 'highlight' a part of the text and press 'Quote'
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