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"Slang is mostly made by lively, imaginative people, who are not afraid of being different from others or of breaking the accepted rules of grammar and speech. It has been called 'the plain man's poetry' and is valuable because it gives new life to old ideas. Naturally it occurs most in everyday conversation, but slang words should not be used in serious writing. A time of war suggests thousands of new slang words - most of which are forgotten after a few years; but some live on and gradually make their way into the accepted vocabulary of a language."
...
"The lasting value of slang is found in those words which live on and help to keep English a vigorous and youthful language."

Unfortunately I can't give you the source of these lines because I don't know it. The author is in all likelihood dead by now. The extract is part of a translation test I had to take as a schoolboy ages ago.

Do you agree with the author about slang? What is your opinion about slang and its importance? When and where can or should one use slang - or should slang be completely avoided?

Cheers
CB
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Hi Cool Breeze,

Are all slang offensive? Or just like everything else under the Sun, they ying-yang across the language landscape? In my own language, Vietnamese, slang often (if not always) carry bad connotation.

From afar or in a neutral position, slang help enrich and rejuvenate the language. If slang are created for offensive purposes, I would consider them as language potholes. A movie that shows a vehicle swinging side-to-side or bouncing up-and-down on a road among the grandeur of a mountain range might be a scene to remember, but I sure want to be on a smooth highway myself whether I am the driver or a passenger.

Definitely, I would paint a picture with potholes but certainly would not create them (mainly due to my inability!) Emotion: smile

Cheers,
Hoa Thai
Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hoa Thai In my own language, Vietnamese, slang often (if not always) carry bad connotation.
It is my experience that in SE Asia a high premium is placed on using correct* language. I suspect that this is because "correct speech" is one of the elements of the Noble Eightfold Path of Buddhism.

* "Correct" here implies "conforming to social norms" and not "grammatical".
Forbes
Hoa Thai In my own language, Vietnamese, slang often (if not always) carry bad connotation.
It is my experience that in SE Asia a high premium is placed on using correct* language. I suspect that this is because "correct speech" is one of the elements of the Noble Eightfold Path of Buddhism.

* "Correct" here implies "conforming to social norms" and not "grammatical".
I am not quite sure! In any society, there always be ying versus yang in all aspects of life. For people, however, besides those who firmly take side, there are those who can blend in and adapt easily to whom they deal with.

That said, in , regardless of the group of people that one identifies with, when it comes to superstition, parents might chose a slang word or even a non-slang ugly term to nickname / label a baby hoping to prevent evil spirits from taking the children away.

Regards,
Hoa Thai