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Hi,

I have some questions as to whether you would consider the pronunciations below just casual language or already slang.

1) T + Y = CH
Can't you do it? [Canchoo do it?]
Don't you like it? [Donchoo like it?]
Aren't you ...? [Arnchoo ...?]
Got you. [Gotcha.]

2) Omitting certain letters
Get them = Get 'em.
Let me know as soon as possible. = Lemme know as soon as possible.
Give me that. = Gimme that.
How do you know? = How d'you know?
I don't know. = I dunno.
How's it going? = How's it goin'?

3) Pronouncing you [yu] as [ya]
Example: Would you [ya] do that for me?

Can you tell me whether you think the pronunciations above are just casual language or already slang? When would you consider them appropriate and when not?

Regards,
Paul
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Comments  
I'd consider them all just different ways of pronouncing words. I wouldn't consider a word slang until it's a totally different word or an extra word that isn't necessary. For example:

"What's up, dawg?" "dawg" is slang because it's not necessary for the sentence's meaning, and it's a non-standard term for a person.

Does that help, Paul?

-Haoqide
I think you're right in that this isn't actually slang because as you say it's just a different way of pronouncing something. I just used the term slang in lack of a better word for it.

My main concern, however, is to know when it would be appropriate to use these pronunciations.

My feeling is that they should not be used in educational institutions like school or university, nor should they used in places where everything needs to be formally correct, e.g. before court or in offices.

I can imagine friends talking that way to each other. But then again I think that it matters which social or age group these friends belong to. It rather seems like a thing for teenagers and maybe "lower social classes" (not meant to be negative) to me.
I'm 30 and have a university degree. Would people find it strange if I talked this way (in informal situations, of course)?

Paul
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I see what you're asking, Paul.

The only ones of those that I use in my daily speech (I'm 24 years old) are "Gotcha", "Lemme", "Gimme", "I dunno", and "How's it goin'?"

I often hear 40-somethings with college degrees use those same words in casual situations, even around the office (not in meetings). It really depends on your personality and style. I'm a very casual type of person, so I'll probably use those until I'm in my 80's.Emotion: smile If someone thinks less of me for it, I really don't care. They're not grammatically incorrect, and they're easily understood, so I think you'd be okay using them in every-day conversation, just not formal meetings.
Thanks for the answer, haogide. That was exactly what I wanted to know.
Great, you're welcome! If there's anything else I can do, let me know.

-Haoqide
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Guest1) T + Y = CH
Can't you do it? [Canchoo do it?]
Don't you like it? [Donchoo like it?]
Aren't you ...? [Arnchoo ...?]
Got you. [Gotcha.]
This is very much American^ Only american speakers will say things like this.

The rest are also more common in American speech, but yes I would consider then 'lazy' and not appropriate in some situations

Except for d'you, which is pronounced "Joo' like the words 'Jew', 'Due' and 'Dew'

Joo like that? I think 'Do you like that' would be a very protentious way of saying things and don't think anyone would naturally say it unless they were placing emphasis on the Do or You.
jakethomas991
Guest1) T + Y = CH
Can't you do it? [Canchoo do it?]
Don't you like it? [Donchoo like it?]
Aren't you ...? [Arnchoo ...?]
Got you. [Gotcha.]
This is very much American^ Only american speakers will say things like this.
Hmm, I'm pretty sure the T + Y assimilation occurs in British English too.

All the stuff discussed here can be found in a good accent reduction course (for either British English or American English).
Well, as a native speaker from Central England, I can assure you no one will ever say 'canchoo' , 'donchoo' or 'Gotcha'.

What does happen in English English on the other hand is some T + U = Ch

Tuna becomes 'Choona'
Tuesday becomes 'Choosday'
Tunes become 'Choons'

However, 'Tuck' remains 'Tuck'

and tumble remains 'Tumble'
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