Hi,

The other day I watched a video that said when you are late for class and want to excuse yourslef, you have to say to the teacher: I slept in and NOT I overslept...Is it correct? And is it I've overslept or I overslept? The teacher said it's wrong to use overslept in English.

Please correcct my question as well, so next time I don't make the same mistakes while asking.

Here is the video at http://www.engvid.com/classroom-vocabulary /

Thanks alot.
1 2
Dear Osama91,

I watched the entire video.

The woman is incorrect and I have no idea why she would have made such a statement.

We DO say oversleep (overslept) in English. It is perfectly acceptable and used all the time.

Here is the definition of the word (along with an example of usage) from The Oxford Dictionary of the English Language:

oversleep |ˌōvərˈslēp|
verb ( past and past part. -slept) [ intransitive ]
to sleep longer or later than one intended : We talked until the early hours and consequently I overslept.

Sorry - on her behalf - for the confusion.

John

PS: Again, another example of the unreliable information you may come across on the Internet in general, and YouTube in particular.
Thank you, John. I guess Canadians do not use oversleep! Lol
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If you tell your teacher that you slept in she might very will assume that you were deliberately late for class.

"Overslept" means that you slept longer that you intended. Ex. "I overslept and ended up missing the bus."

"Slept in" means that you deliberately slept longer than usual. Ex. "Saturday is the only day of the week I can sleep in."
Hi,

I guess Canadians do not use oversleep! Yes, we do!Emotion: smile

We also use 'slept in'.

If you give 'I slept in' as an excuse for being late, I can't imagine anybody I know would take this as meaning you did it intentionally. Context is imporant.

Clive
Clive, my reaction was the same as MalRey's (which is why I verified his post.) To me, "I slept in" suggests that it was intentional.

I would also disagree with the video teacher's sugggestion that "Can I please go to the bathroom/washroom" is just as good as "May I.... ." Certainly "Can I" is often heard, but I believe that when you are requesting permission, "May I" is definitely preferred. Especially if the teacher you are asking is an English teacher.
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Hi,

To me, "I slept in" suggests that it was intentional.
Maybe it's a British English thing. Emotion: surprise I've said and heard it all my life.

Clive
Wow -- another British/American difference!
khoffI would also disagree with the video teacher's sugggestion that "Can I please go to the bathroom/washroom" is just as good as "May I.... ." Certainly "Can I" is often heard, but I believe that when you are requesting permission, "May I" is definitely preferred.
As early as 1965 the British linguist Palmer was writing how old-fashioned may is in that context:

"Both can and may are used for deontic possibility (giving permission) but may is mostly literary, formal or old-fashioned. In speech can is more common." (Palmer, The English Verb)

CJ
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