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Squatters have moved into a vacant office block in Paris and also set up a tent city along a canal in the capital.
The office building, near the Paris stock exchange, has been nicknamed the "ministry for the housing crisis".

Three housing lobby groups took it over and then invited families to move in. Homeless Parisians are also camping out in 200 tents by the Canal Saint Martin.
Lobby groups say about a million people in France are homeless, of whom 100,000 are sleeping on the streets.
Under the government plan, from the end of 2008, the right to housing will apply to homeless people, impoverished workers and single mothers.
All those living in slums are to benefit from the same right from the start of 2012, Mr de Villepin said.
The new legislation is designed to put housing in the same legal category as education and health in French law. It is a key demand of the campaign groups for the homeless.

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I don't think to say 'sleeping on the streets' is correct. It should be 'sleeping in the street'. Usually or rather I have seen homeless people sleeping in the pavements. If they sleep on the streets, the traffic should be detour. What do you think?
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I see it the same way.
sleeping on the streets indicates for me (AmE) sleeping in the area where cars travel.
sleeping in the streets indicates sleeping in the area where people walk.
On the other hand, my brain adjusts fairly easily to the use of on for in, and I find it understandable in the terms it was intended. I'm not inclined to make a federal case of it. Emotion: smile
BrE may be different on this point.

CJ
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BRE

The street is the whole thing: road, pavements (sidewalks) and all. So kids can play in the street, people can walk down the street, and you could sleep on the street.

The road is the thing that vehicles go on.
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Comments  
Could anyone tell me what is the difference between IN/ON so great as to make a native speaker as well as Nobel Prize Laureate use IN before using ON after only several sentences?

-The first theory announced by the authorities was that the President's car was in Houston Street.

...after only several sentences...

-Dotted lines had been drawn from the building to a vehicle on Houston Street.
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