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1.However, since I have a leather couch I expected it to slip out of being tucked into the creases of the pillows after having sat on the couch for a while.


2.When we create labels, set goals and listen to the criteria of success - we seem to slip out of being.


Q1)I just came across the expression "slipping out of being", but I'm not sure about the exact meaning of "slip out of being tucked into.." and "slip out of being".


Q2) Are both "slip out of being tucked into..." and "slip out of being" correct English?

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fire1Q1)I just came across the expression "slipping out of being", but I'm not sure about the exact meaning of "slip out of being tucked into.." and "slip out of being".

You label this Q1, which I assume is "Question 1", but it's not a question. It's a statement that says you're not sure about two meanings.

You tuck a slipcover into the creases in a couch. See the picture at the end of this post. When you get up, the slipcover may slip from its tucked state and become loose, and you have to tuck it in again. The slipcover slips out of being tucked (into ...).

"being" is sometimes used alone as a noun. Its meaning is somewhat vague, but it is more or less our natural state, a sort of meditative existence free from interfering thoughts and feelings. When we start thinking about or worrying about our goals and our desire for success, we stop simply being in the world. We are no longer in a calm and natural state of being. We have slipped out of being.

fire1Q2) Are both "slip out of being tucked into..." and "slip out of being" correct English?

Yes, but they are not usages that you will often hear or see.

CJ

Comments  

I'm a native English speaker in the US, and this is the first time I've heard the phrase "slip out of being". Sentences 1 and 2 make no sense to me. The phrase "slip out of" is used in statements like:


I'm going to slip out of this outfit into something more comfortable.

I slipped out of his grasp at the last second.


In the two given sentences someone has apparently made up his own usage of "slip out of being", with a meaning something like "lose track of time" or "forget yourself". But this is not valid English usage. A month from now it won't exist.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.