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Please can you say me which is more correct and why?

can you spaek slower please
can you speak more slowly please

can you speak louder please
can you speak more loudly please

can you do that quieter please
can you do that more quietly please

Thank you
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Hello, Siernan-- and welcome to English Forums.

Please can you say me which is more correct and why?-- All of the below are correct. The first of each pair is informal.

Can you speak slower, please?
Can you speak more slowly, please?

Can you speak louder, please?
Can you speak more loudly, please?

Can you do that quieter, please?
Can you do that more quietly, please?
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I HAVE CHECKED MY GRAMMAR BOOKS BEFORE POSTING

Siernan,

I am only an anonymous visitor, but I, too, welcome you. You will

always find reliable answers here from experts, such as the gentleman

who posted the first answer. We non-experts are allowed to reply if

we try to give reasonable answers. I believe that there is a

difference, but -- of course -- I may be mistaken.

*****

Technically speaking, slower is an adjective: slow, slower, slowest.

There were two trains. I could get a ticket only on the slower one.

Technically speaking, slowly is an adverb.

I speak slowly; Tom speaks more slowly than I; Martha speaks

the most slowly of us three.

In everyday conversation, people do not want to take the time that

is necessary to say: Would you speak more slowly, please?

So they just say: Would you speak slower, please?

When you write, you may wish to use the "correct" form, but

in speech, I would guess that most people use the "popular"

form -- except in formal speeches.
Hello Mister Micawber

Thanks you for your speed reponse.

Thanks also Annon for your interested and additions.

This is a great Forum to come and receive help Emotion: smile

Adverbs that are identical in form with adjectives take inflections following the same spelling and phonetic:

Early-earlier-earliest

Late-later-latest

Slow-slower-slowest

Several adverbs ending in - ly (quickly, loudly) form comparatives to the same pattern, dropping their adverb forming suffix:

quickly - quicker-quickest

Loudly-louder-loudest

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