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Context: an information sheet for presenters at a conference.

"This is an international conference where most participants are not native English speakers. This means speaking in a slightly slower register and explaining any acronyms or references"

I'm not quite sure about the part in boldface. Is there such a thing as a "slow register"? I wonder if they meant "slightly slower pace" (which would be reasonable in this context) or possibly "slightly lower register" (but don't think so, it's a conference after all).

[:^)]

Any ideas?
Thank you,
Comments  
Hi,
It's a rather odd phrase. I think they are probably trying to convey both of the ideas that you have mentioned.

Clive
Thank you, Clive.
Emotion: smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I think it does refer to a lower register. At a conference where participants are not native speakers, one would want to speakactually in al lower register (on the vocal scale), avoiding harsh, vibrant, exuberant, high-pitched tones. One would also want to speak in slower speed, but that probably has nothing to do with 'register'.

On a recent trip to Scandinavia, we were at dinner in a home outside Copenhagen, and the hostess said she appreciated my distinct articulation and the pitch of my voice, as she normally has trouble understanding native English speakers. I usually speak in a lower voice when dealing with non-native speakers. [Of course her English was a gazillion times better than my Danish.]
PhilipAt a conference where participants are not native speakers, one would want to speak actually in a lower register (on the vocal scale), avoiding harsh, vibrant, exuberant, high-pitched tones.
Hi Philip,

Thanks for this info.
I didn't know "register" could be associated with pitch and intonation. I thought it had to do only with choice of vocabulary, level of formality etc. Emotion: surprise
I didn't know "register" could be associated with pitch and intonation. I thought it had to do only with choice of vocabulary, level of formality etc.

More with pitch than with intonation. The four basic registers are soprano, mezzo-soprano (formerly alto), tenor and bass. Of course they overlap considerably.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

More with pitch than with intonation. The four basic registers are soprano, mezzo-soprano (formerly alto), tenor and bass. Of course they overlap considerably.
I used to sing soprano in my church choir. Emotion: smile
Good were those days...[8]
slower register makes no sense to me.
lower register makes no sense to me in the sense of speaking slang.
lower register makes little sense, if any, to me in the sense of lowering the pitch of the voice.
I think they mean "Speak slowly".
CJ