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This might not be a grammar question but more like a word usage one. I have seen people use Sneak "Peak" everywhere to instead of Peek.

Is this is a mistake?
Thnx
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Hello Guest

I'm an English learner from Japan. Could you allow me to try to answer your question?

I think 'sneak peak' is a phrase born by misspelling 'sneak peek' (stealthy quick look). But it is true many people are using 'sneak peak' as the headline phrase on their web pages.(google result: [sneak peak...242,000 hits] and [sneak peek ...456,000 hits]). I imagine they might have used "sneak peak" in the meaning of "Here is a hidden hottest spot".

paco
Don't underestimate the inability of most English speakers to spell their language, Paco! I had a look at the first couple of pages of the 242,000 and none of them seem aware of any punning value in 'peek/peak'. I prefer your initial assessment: 'sneak' attracts 'peak'. Well, at least they didn't write 'sneek peek'... did they?...

Omigoodness! 45,000 hits!
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Hello Mr Micawber

I'm wondering what JTT would say when he find so many people are using 'sneak peak'. Would he say 'sneak peak' is a contextually (or descriptively) right spelling?

paco
It will be interesting to see, Paco.
I agree with Paco's assessment. I wonder how I can tell my husband that I am right when my son's second grade teacher's keeps sending out e-mails every week saying sneak peak. He told me that I am wrong and that sneak peak and sneak peek are interchangeable according to Cambridge dictionary. I looked up Cambridge dictionary and its definition: an opportunity to see something before it is officially available. If we look into each word separately, we can analyze it without being confused: peek- take a quick look, peak- reach the highest point. When we combine sneak to peek, it makes sense that it means to view something in advance or sneak preview. Since English isn't my first language, it can be difficult because I have heard a lot of misused words that have become a normalcy, such drive safe vs. drive safely.
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AnonymousHe told me that I am wrong and that sneak peak and sneak peek are interchangeable according to Cambridge dictionary.
He doesn't know how to use a dictionary. I just looked at the Cambridge dictionary on-line and the only definition of "peak", the noun is "the pointed top of a mountain, or the mountain itself". I can't see how a quick look at anything can involve the top of a mountain. That's pretty ridiculous, unless you take a sneak peek at a peak. Emotion: smile
AnonymousWhen we combine sneak to with peek, it makes sense that it means to view something in advance or sneak preview.
Exactly. There is no doubt that 'sneak peek' is the correct form.
AnonymousI wonder how I can tell my husband that I am right
Tell him you read all about it here on English forums, and we are never wrong! Emotion: smile

CJ