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Hi teachers,



Sergeant:


Why don’t you go out to her place and she if she’s all right?


Policeman:


Who? Me? On a night like this?


Sergeant:


It’s not far. So, you’ve got your bike, haven’t you?



In this conversation the word 'so' it's like a pause word. Like hmm, er, and um, it has no meaning.

But grammatically speaking what is 'so'? Is it an adverb, an adjective?

Tthanks in advance
Comments  
Thinking SpainHi teachers, Sergeant:“Why don’t you go out to her place and see if she’s all right?”Policeman:“Who? Me? On a night like this?”Sergeant:“It’s not far. So, you’ve got your bike, haven’t you?” In this conversation the word 'so' it's like a pause word. Like hmm, er, and um, it has no meaning.But grammatically speaking what is 'so'? Is it an adverb, an adjective? Tthanks in advance

I think that "so" is used to start a new sentence (conjunction probably?). However, I'd expect a long pause between the two sentences (the one containing "so" and the one preceding it). The way it's written sounds a bit strage to me.
Thanks for your help. the sentence was taken from a book, and I have to explain it to my students. Still don't know what is 'so' grammatically speaking.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I've just seen this http://www.thefreedictionary.com/so (meaning 7)
I don't think it's necessary in this sentence...

'So' is used after a pause to give a clarification for an action like ' I took you're ball so I can play it with my friends.

or like ' They turned off lights so they can sleep'.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thank you. It is a great help the web page!
Thank you very much Alephendra. Everything learnt, everything to be learn.