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The fiscal 2008 draft budget includes ¥2.2 billion to push research on the so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

Can I replace 'the so-called' with 'what is called'?

Is it true that 'so-called' is usually used when the name tends to have a bad meaning?

Thanks
LiJ
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LiveinjapanThe fiscal 2008 draft budget includes ¥2.2 billion to push research on the so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

Can I replace 'the so-called' with 'what is called'?

Is it true that 'so-called' is usually used when the name tends to have a bad meaning?

Thanks
LiJso-called Show phonetics
adjective [before noun]

1. used to show that you think a word that is used to describe someone or something is not suitable or not correct:
It was one of his so-called friends who supplied him with the drugs that killed him.

2. used to introduce a new word or phrase which is not yet known by many people:
It isn't yet clear how destructive this so-called 'super virus' is.


'what is called' cannot be used because it cannot fit into the sentence.

Is it true that 'so-called' is usually used when the name tends to have a bad meaning?

I don't think you can say it is usually used, but it can be used based on definition 1 above.

Thanks, YL. I understand.
Yoong Liat'what is called' cannot be used because it cannot fit into the sentence.
Do you mean 'grammarically wrong' or 'not natural'?

Thanks
LiJ
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LiveinjapanThanks, YL. I understand.
Yoong Liat'what is called' cannot be used because it cannot fit into the sentence.
Do you mean 'grammarically (typo, I believe) wrong' or 'not natural'?

Thanks
LiJ

It means 'grammatically wrong'.

Yoong LiatDo you mean 'grammarically (typo, I believe) Oops! Emotion: smile
Could you help me understand it further? I think both have the 'research on N' structure, so I don't understand why it's not correct.

Thanks
LiJ
Liveinjapan
Yoong LiatDo you mean 'grammarically (typo, I believe) Oops! Emotion: smile
Could you help me understand it further? I think both have the 'research on N' structure, so I don't understand why it's not correct.

Thanks
LiJ

The fiscal 2008 draft budget includes ¥2.2 billion to push research on the so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

The fiscal 2008 draft budget includes ¥2.2 billion to push research on the what is called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. (grammatically wrong)

The fiscal 2008 draft budget includes ¥2.2 billion to push research on what is called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. (I think this is also grammatically wrong.)

The original sentence is grammatically correct and needs no amendment.
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Yoong Liat needs no amendment. Yes, I know
Many thanks, YL. I just want to know the difference in structure. I see the structures are the same.

LiJ
Liveinjapan
Yoong Liat needs no amendment. Yes, I know
Many thanks, YL. I just want to know the difference in structure. I see the structures are the same.

LiJ

Hi LiJ

Sometimes phrases and clauses look the same, but they cannot replace other phrases/clauses.

Even a sentence with an article missing can have different meanings.

He went to school. He went to the school.

He went to church. He went to the church.

Both the sentences look similar (only the article is missing), but they have different meanings.

I hope this helps.
Yoong LiatHe went to school. He went to the school.
Yes, they are different but grammatically correct.

to push research on the so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells

to push research on what is called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells

Although the second sentence is a bit ambiguous, since 'what' means 'the thing which', it might be acceptable and grammatically correct, in my opinion.

I want to thank you for helping me, YL.
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