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A: You outspoken me in the church. This sentence means you spoke more than me.

B: I was outspoken in the church. This sentence is the passive form of sentence A but this sentence doesn’t mean the same as the sentence A. It just means I spoke without caring about what others have to say.

Can someone please help me understand even though they are the same sentence with passive and active form, why do they have completely different meanings? My head is spinning.

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If you want to show an active/passive pair of sentences, you need different sentences. You need a sentence with a direct object for the active form:

The boy threw the ball over the fence.

Then, to make the passive sentence, you make the direct object the subject:

The ball was thrown over the fence (by the boy).

CJ

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CalifJim

If you want to show an active/passive pair of sentences, you need different sentences. You need a sentence with a direct object for the active form:

The boy threw the ball over the fence.

Then, to make the passive sentence, you make the direct object the subject:

The ball was thrown over the fence (by the boy).

CJ

Thank for replying but I am confused on the passive and active form of the verb ‘outspeak’.


You outspoke me in the church.

I was outspoken in the church. (By you)


But they have completely different meanings, why? First sentence says you spoke more than me. The second sentence says I was the one who spoke without caring about what others have to say. They have completely different meanings even though they are the same sentence with two different sentence forms. I am confused. Could you please help me with the confusion?

anonymousCould you please help me with the confusion?
anonymousFirst sentence says you spoke more than me.

I have never seen the inflected verb "outspeak" used. It is exceedingly rare.

anonymousThe second sentence says I was the one who spoke without caring about what others have to say.

The participle (an adjective) "outspoken" is very common and frequent. It means that the person is not reluctant to give their opinion. It is not the passive voice form in your sentence. Adding "by you" would only get quizzical looks.

The problem is that outspeak is so very rarely used in modern English that almost no one knows what it means. Most people don't know what the active form means, and it's nearly impossible to know what the passive form means because outspoken will be taken as an adjective which has a well-known meaning.

In other words, outspoken is taken an adjective, not a verb, so when you change outspeak to be outspoken for purposes of making a passive sentence, you risk not being understood at all.

anonymous

You outspoke me in the church.

I was outspoken in the church. (By you)


But they have completely different meanings

No, they don't have different meanings. You know what you intended them to mean, but nobody else does. This is because of the factors I mentioned at the beginning of this post.

CJ

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