Hi,

Suppoing that I said that someone have some conveniences, or is in some situations. And I don't have such conveniences or am not in such situations.

How can I represent my ideal? for example

You can buy any thing you want because you have so much money.

So don't I. ( I don't have enough money to buy something I want)

Is "So don't I" grammatically correct? And is it represent exactly what I mean? If not, please let me know what way to say that ideal.

Thanks in advance.
1 2
So do I for positive agreemen.
Neither do I for negative.

"Anything" is one word if I am not mistaken.
Hi James,
Are you asking "question tag" for this sentence?
Regards,
sri
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So don't I doesn't work as you are compairing yourself to the first speaker.

Neither do I also doesn't work as the spreaker could afford and you can't.

If you wanted to sound un-impressed you could say "So, I don't." (You don't care that he can buy anything because you can't).
Hi James,
You can buy anything you want, can't you?
Reason:
You can buy anything you want - positive statement
can't you? - Negative Tag.

Regards,
sri
Dave PhillipsSo don't I doesn't work as you are compairing yourself to the first speaker. Neither do I also doesn't work as the spreaker could afford and you can't. If you wanted to sound un-impressed you could say "So, I don't." (You don't care that he can buy anything because you can't).

maybe I made you misunderestand. There is only one speaker here.

I said "you are rich so you can buy anything you want"

then I said "I'm not in such condition"

another example :

I said " he have a big family so support so he can't waste money.

then I said "I don't have to do so"

I say about the situation of a person. Then I just want to say that I'm in a different or even opposite situation. Is there a common way to represent that ideal. ( like "so do I", "so am I", "neither do I", "neither am I" when I represent the ideal that I'm in the same situation or I'm not in that situation too)

Thanks.
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james doI said "you are rich so you can buy anything you want"
then I said "I'm not in such condition that position

james doI said " he have has a big family so to support so he can't waste money.
then I said "I don't have to do so that concern"
"
james do
I said "you are rich so you can buy anything you want"
then I said "I'm not in such condition"
Expressing it in another way: I am not rich like you, so

another example :
I said " he have a big family so support so he can't waste money.
then I said "I don't have to do so"

James,
Your sentences are quite misleading in terms of agreeing to the typical " so do I..." or neither do I..." construction. You said: you are a rich guy and can buy anything you want- which is a positve statement. However, you went on to say: " I am not rich so I can't buy as I want. The opposing concepts contradict each other and thus not allow the "so + aux + do I " and the " neither+ aux + do I" format to form an semantically intellegible concept.
Positive agreement

You are rich, so am I
So you can buy as you want, so can I.
Negative agreement

I am not rich, neither are you
It's true. I don't have a fancy car, but neither do you.

Hope that helped answering your questions...

Hi James

Dave understands your question, and so do I. (the same, two affirmative ideas)

Dimsum did not fully understand your question, and neither did Sreesri. (the same, two negative ideas)

There are various different ways to use the word 'so'.
Basically, in the phrase 'so do I', the word 'so' introduces an idea that is the same as the idea in the first part of the sentence. The word 'neither' basically means 'also not'. Saying 'neither do I' basically means 'I also do not'.
james doI said "you are rich so you can buy anything you want"
then I said "I'm not in such condition"
Your two sentences are in contrast to each other. One is positive and the other is negative. They are not the same; they're opposites. Therefore, you can't use a phrase that indicates sameness. Instead, it would be appropriate to join the two ideas with a word that indicates a difference/contrast:

- You are rich, but I'm not.
- You can buy anything you want, but I can't.
james doI said " he have a big family so support so he can't waste money.
then I said "I don't have to do so"
- He has a big family to support, but I don't.
- He can't afford to waste money, but I can.
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