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A guy talks about his girlfriend Kimi who read
a text message from another girl on her boyfriend's phone.
She texted me yesterday asking me when I was gonna come pick
up some surfingboard that Kimi won and... I don't know, you know, "Oh, so good
to see you at the beach
," (he says it was a plain greeting message?)
all this stuff. Yeah, you know, she might have
written a couple of things that, if you read them out of context, If you dunno what's the case?
they could have been misunderstood.
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Your two underscored phrases are related. "To take something out of context" is a very well-known problem, in which someone tries to guess at the meaning of a portion of something without having access to the rest of it - or deliberately omits certain parts to make it misleading.

So he doesn't know if a "personal relationship" is indicated.
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How do you mean related? The one with the beach
indicates personal relationship? As in too personal?
By putting "is indicated" in the passive voice, I can duck all your technical questions. Emotion: big smile

It's like making a medical diagnosis. I can say "appendicitis is indicated," without stating how I came to that conclusion.

The passage you quote simply raises the question as to whether or not the text message might later be shown to have been written by a girl who in fact has a romantic interest in the boyfriend. (I may have my characters mixed up.)

I didn't say the text message did or did not indicate a romantic relationship. That's why I used the passive.