+0
Help me understand the meaning of this sentence.
I am sorry that you respect my love for Schubert's serenade so little as to make fun of it.
The context: http://lengish.com/texts/difficult/the-serenade-2.html

Can this sentence be rephrased this way?
I am sorry that you respect my love for Schubert's serenade so little as to make fun of it. = I am sorry that you respect my love for Schubert's serenade so little that you make fun of it.
+0
Hi,

Can this sentence be rephrased this way?

I am sorry that you respect my love for Schubert's serenade so little as to make fun of it. = I am sorry that you respect my love for Schubert's serenade so little that you make fun of it. Yes.

She thinks that he made fun of it and that he continues to think it is funny.

Best wishes, Clive
+0
So....that; so....as to
We can use "so" followed by an adjective or an adverb and a that-clause in sentence such as:
The recipe was so simple that even I could cook it = because the recipe was so simple, even I could cook it.
He was walking so slowly that before too long we caught him up = because he was walking so slowly....
Less commonly we use "so" followed by and adjective and "as to" with a similar meaning:
The difference was so small as to not be worth arguing about it (=because the difference was so small, it wasn't worth arguing about)
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Comments  
MoivileHelp me understand the meaning of this sentence.
I am sorry that you respect my love for Schubert's serenade so little as to make fun of it.
The context: http://lengish.com/texts/difficult/the-serenade-2.html

Can this sentence be rephrased this way?
I am sorry that you respect my love for Schubert's serenade so little as to make fun of it. = I am sorry that you respect my love for Schubert's serenade so little that you could make fun of it.

Hi.

Emotion: football as to/in order to is followed by an infinitive clause which refers to a purpose. It's so called Infinitive Clause. There can also be Subordinate Clause with conjuctions so that, in order that, lest, for fear (that).

He did so as to harras me!
Jane works hard so as to give everything to her children.
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
That story is a riot. Thanks for making me truly laugh out loud. Yes, you may rephrase it as you have done.
Perhaps if he had chosen to play it on my native instrument, the trombone, her mistaking it for the human voice would have had a more favorable result for the hornist's rival.

BTW, I wasn't aware the piece commonly known as "Shubert's Serenade" had lyrics. (I used to play it on the piano when I was seven or eight.) Perhaps that's why your hero chose the french horn.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
 Moivile's reply was promoted to an answer.