I saw this in a Eudora newsgroup today and thought some here might find it interesting, not that the topic hasn't arisen before:

'Acocdrnig to an elgnsih unviesitry sutdy the oredr of letetrs in a wrod dosen't mttaer, the olny thnig thta's iopmrantt is that the frsit and lsat ltteer of eevry word is in the crcreot ptoision. The rset can be jmbueld and one is stlil able to raed the txet wiohtut dclftfuiiy.'
Interesting to me is the truth of the last sentence, even though a number of words in the paragraph are badly jumbled.

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs>at>eircom>dot>net
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I saw this in a Eudora newsgroup today and thought some here might find it interesting, not that the topic ... me is the truth of the last sentence, even though a number of words in the paragraph are badly jumbled.

I'd think that if the subject is fairly simple, the last sentence expresses a truth. If the sentence were to be about a technical or scientific subject, things would change a bit.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
I saw this in a Eudora newsgroup today and thought some here might find it interesting, not that the topic ... me is the truth of the last sentence, even though a number of words in the paragraph are badly jumbled.

This has been posted here before with the rules for legibility. The reason I know this is that I once posted it here and was most indelicately chided for causing anguish to certain AUEers for having to read this material yet again. Warning: keep you head down, Charles.
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I saw this in a Eudora newsgroup today and thought ... a number of words in the paragraph are badly jumbled.

I'd think that if the subject is fairly simple, the last sentence expresses a truth. If the sentence were to be about a technical or scientific subject, things would change a bit.

Jeez, these are getting more pathetic as time goes by. "The rset can be jmbueld and one is stlil able to raed the txet" well, duh, look how non-jumbled that is!
Now, if "T-e r t c-n be j d a-d o-e is s l a e to r d t-e t t w t d y" was instantly readable, I might have been a teensy bit more impressed.
Someone over at a.f.u showed that if you leave the first and letter alone and strictly reverse the inside letters, the result is quite hard to puzzle out (unless you see the technique). "Anidroccg" and so on.

B t w s D a R x
>
>
Yes.
I understand that whole languages have prospered leaving out written vowels entirely. Consider a related scheme first and last letters correct, respect the consonants, jumble the interior vowels. In the example nearly every word fits this order,
or is only one simple transposition away from this order. The portion that Donna pulled out doesn't even need the one transposition allowance.
The only words that are more than one transposition away are elgnsih
unviesitry one consonant out of order, 0 if not count 'r' iopmrantt this has two separated transitions
dclftfuiiy
So, one hard word (difficulty), and we have a running start.

Take a paragraph with a lot of jumbled consonants and I'll bet it is not so clear. Most words occurring in the wild don't have even three interior consonants to jumble, so this trick will often succeed.
Richard Maurer To reply, remove half
Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also.
Charles Riggs (Email Removed) wrote on 14 Nov 2003:

Well, I certainly don't because whenever I make a typo, a thinko, or a spelling mistake these days, I get flamed or sighed at for it. I used to be a good speller, but this month I must've hit all the words I'm not sure about or spell incorrectly.
And while we're at it, does anyone pronounce the "mobile" ('mo bile) in "mobile phone" and "mobile unit" they way Mobil Oil Co. is pronounced ('mo bl)? I do, but I don't know why.
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Yes, I do. It's easier to say, but I don't know if that's the reason. I've joked that I'd open a wireless division for my company Trexon and call it "Trexon Mobile", which sounds a bit like Exxon Mobil, at least the way I say it.

"In 1911, the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the dissolution of the Standard Oil Trust, resulting in the spin-off of 34 companies, including Jersey Standard and Socony. In the same year, the nation's kerosene output was eclipsed for the first time by a formerly discarded byproduct - gasoline. The growing automotive market ultimately inspired the product trademark Mobiloil, registered by Socony in 1920."
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany

"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward" (Email Removed) Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
Yes, I do. It's easier to say, but I don't know if that's the reason. I've joked that I'd open ... Trexon and call it "Trexon Mobile", which sounds a bit like Exxon Mobil, at least the way I say it.

I wonder how the Mobil company answers the phone in Mobile, AL.
'Acocdrnig to an elgnsih unviesitry sutdy the oredr of letetrs in a wrod dosen't mttaer, the olny thnig thta's iopmrantt ... in the crcreot ptoision. The rset can be jmbueld and one is stlil able to raed the txet wiohtut dclftfuiiy.'

1. All comments to date seem to omit thepossibility of pleasure in reading, which
appears to vary with the skilll of the writer
rather than the deciphering ability of the reader.
2. Focus on the (dis)order of letters is anacademic fraud, so far as it covertly entails
that (nearly) every word be spelled correctly.
But letter order is an irremovable element
of correct spelling: the supposed study
appears to conceal this paradox.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs (Ottawa, Canada)
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