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He realized that the world could run out of key resources, ------------ he was a harsh critic of the wastefulness of modern industrial society.

A) so that
B) whether
C) so long as
D) and so
E) but

I have no objection to "D" but "A" could also be a logical answer . May I take your comments on the question please? And a last word, is double coordinative conjunction possible as in "and so"?

Thank you friends!
Comments  
I believe you are right! Emotion: big smile about answer "D". But "A" is not the right context.

"So that" is mostly used in context in which one does something for reason(s) of achieving something else.

Paul has to get to work on time from now so that he can avoid getting fired.

Nick wants to work parttime after school so that he can save for college.
Goodman
I believe you are right! Emotion: big smile about answer "D". But "A" is not the right context.

"So that" is mostly used in context in which one does something for reason(s) of achieving something else.

Paul has to get to work on time from now so that he can avoid getting fired.

Nick wants to work parttime after school so that he can save for college.

But, Goodman, isn't your explanation "so that" for the purpose clauses; "so that" is also used, especially with a comma, to inform a result. As Miriam said earlier somewhere in the forum:

http://www.englishforums.com/English/NounAdjectiveAdverbClauses/gzvc/Post.htm
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"So that" can denote a result or logical consequence; so it would seem to be ok here.

MrP

PS: I would take the "so" in "and so" as an adverb: "therefore".
Yulysess
Goodman
I believe you are right! Emotion: big smile about answer "D". But "A" is not the right context.

"So that" is mostly used in context in which one does something for reason(s) of achieving something else.

Paul has to get to work on time from now so that he can avoid getting fired.

Nick wants to work parttime after school so that he can save for college.

But, Goodman, isn't your explanation "so that" for the purpose clauses; "so that" is also used, especially with a comma, to inform a result. As Miriam said earlier somewhere in the forum:

http://www.englishforums.com/English/NounAdjectiveAdverbClauses/gzvc/Post.htm

Actually, the context of your sentence appeared to be a little off to me. As MrP has suggested, "therfore" is the most appropriate for the context with a slight revision.

He realized that the world could run out of key resources. Therefore he became a harsh critic of the wastefulness of modern industrial society.

"Was" somehow didn't fit the context. But that's not what you were asking for. So based on the choices given, I gave you the next closest alternative.

Here are a couple sentences, Which one would you say is correct?

1) We've learned that Susan is leaving the company. Therefore we are giving her a farewell party.

2) We've learned that Susan is leaving the company so that we are giving her a farewell party.



some usage notes on "so that

Usage Note: Many critics and grammarians have insisted that so must be followed by that in formal writing when used to introduce a clause giving the reason for or purpose of an action: He stayed so that he could see the second feature. But since many respected writers use so for so that in formal writing, it seems best to consider the issue one of stylistic preference: The store stays open late so (or so that) people who work all day can buy groceries. ·Both so and so that are acceptably used to introduce clauses that state a result or consequence: The Bay Bridge was still closed, so (or so that) the drive from San Francisco to the Berkeley campus took an hour and a half. ·So is frequently used in informal speech to string together the elements of a narrative. In most cases, this practice should not be carried over into formal writing, where readers need connections to be made more explicit. ·Critics have sometimes objected to the use of so as an intensive meaning “to a great degree or extent,” as in We were so relieved to learn that the deadline had been extended. This usage is most common in informal contexts, perhaps because, unlike the neutral very, it presumes that the listener or reader will be sympathetic to the speaker's evaluation of the situation. Thus one would be more apt to say It was so unfair of them not to invite you than to say It was so fortunate that I didn't have to put up with your company. For just this reason, the construction may occasionally be used to good effect in more formal contexts to invite the reader to take the point of view of the speaker or subject: The request seemed to her to be quite reasonable; it was so unfair of the manager to refuse. See Usage Note at as1.
Regional Note: New England speakers often use a negative form such as so didn't where other varieties would use the positive so did, as in Sophie ate all her strawberries and so didn't Amelia. Since this usage may confuse a speaker who has not previously encountered it, it is best avoided in writing.
source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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And some extra sentences supporting SO THAT expressing result or consequences:

The doctor explained the nature of my illness in medical terms, so that I didn’t understand fully. [result]
The doctor explained the nature of my illness in medical terms so that I wouldn’t understand fully. [purpose]

She studied very little ,so that she got a rather low grade. [result]
They bought a large house, so that the children had their own rooms [result]
Many contestants later failed drug tests, so that the race had to be rerun. [result]
MamgerAnd some extra sentences supporting SO THAT expressing result or consequences:

She studied very little ,so that she got a rather low grade. [result]
They bought a large house, so that the children had their own rooms [result]
Many contestants later failed drug tests, so that the race had to be rerun. [result]
Um...Sorry! I am afraid that I have to disagree with this usage. Perhaps, it would make more sense if "so that" is replaced with "that's why".

The doctor explained the nature of my illness in medical terms, that's why I didn’t fully understand. [result]
The doctor explained the nature of my illness in medical terms so that I wouldn’t understand fully. [purpose]- this one makes little sense to me.

She studied very little ,that's why she got a rather low grade. [result] so that is not working in this context.
They bought a large house, so that the children had their own rooms [result] This is fine.