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Hello. Can someone please help me with the following phrases (so that, so as to, and so as for) and how to best explain them to an ESL student. My thoughts are as follows:

So that is used with a noun or pronoun. For example, I am going to call her so that she knows I love her. Essentially one action will affect a noun or pronoun.

So as to is used with a verb. For example, I am going to speak softly so as to not disturb you. Essentially, one action will affect a verb.

So as for is used with a noun or pronoun. For example, So as for leaving tomorrow, the trip is off. Essentially, something is in regard to something else.

Thank you to any and all who can help me with this. I love this site!!!
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First of all, so as for is not a grouping. Here so means therefore, and as for goes together as a grouping meaning concerning or in regard to.
So as for leaving tomorrow, the trip is off = Therefore, [concerning / in regard to] leaving tomorrow, the trip is off.
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so that shows purpose. Basically it tells why an action is done.
Jane went and got a knife so that Mark could carve the turkey.
Jane hid the cookies so that the children wouldn't eat them before dinner.
Jane drove fast so that she would not be late.
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so as to is, as mentioned above, a variant of in order to. It also shows purpose.

I'll speak softly [in order not / so as not] to disturb you. (Note the word order so as not to.)
Laura shook him vigorously [in order / so as] to wake him up.
In this construction the subject of the sentence is the subject of the infinitive.
I speak softly. I don't disturb you.
Laura shook him. Laura wakes him up.
That's why you can change the third example of so that thus:
Jane drove fast so that she (=Jane) would not be late. >>> Jane drove fast so as not to be late.
CJ
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Hmm... Emotion: thinkingSo as denotes purpose, why? I bought a dictionary [so as] to learn English. The infinitive (to learn) on its own is enough to denote a reason. You can also say: I bought a dictionary [in order] to learn English. Wouldn't place not between to and the verb. I would say: ... so as not to disturb you.
So as for looks odd to me. I would say: As for / As to / With regard to / As regards leaving tomorrow, the trip is off.
CB
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Comments  
Whats wrong with this:

King Henry VIII sought to have his marriage to Queen Catherine annulled so as to marry Anne Boleyn.

The GMAT Guide says that it is not clear who is about to marry Anne and thus we should use "so that" here.

Please help.
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if i am asked to rewrite the following sentence using "so as to", how must i do?
my mother works hard so that i can afford to study abroad.