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I haven't seen a thread on sociolinguistics. May I start one?

As English becomes the international language to learn,
will non-native speakers' perception towards their first language change because of their need to learn English? Will English become the "cooler" language to learn? I'm seeing some evidence of this back in my hometown.

Any thoughts?
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Have a feeling this is happening everywhere. Certainly it is obvious in Malta especially with youngsters. Please go ahead it sounds interesting.
Hello

I'm an English learner from Japan. I took part in a Japanese learning forum for a while. The language used there was English and there were many young Japanese people who wrote quite good English. But what I was curious about was many of those Japanese participants thought the Japanese grammar in the frame of English grammar. Japanese and English are quite different in construction. For example we say "watashi-wa ringo-ga suki-desu" to mean "I like apples". If I put our phrase into English word to word, it is "as for me, apples are likable". But many Japanese thought like the way; "watashi-wa" ->"I" (subjrct), "ringo-ga" -> "apples"(ringo ga), suki-desu ->"like". So the young Japanese understood "watasi-wa ringo-ga suki-desu" as if it were "I apples like".

In Japanese schools, students are taught English grammar a lot, but little Japanese grammar. Consequently some of the (brightest) students tend to analyze and describe Japanese sentences along the concepts of English grammar. I feel we are rapidly losing the real grammar of the Japanese language, be it good or bad.

paco
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What I'm seeing is a post-colonial backlash. Hong Kong is suffering from a "linguistic identity crisis". Chinese is becoming more important after the 1997 takeover, and HK citizens can't quite make up their mind what the role of English is. Youngsters stake a lot of their pride on their English (it's the prestigious language), but they don't bother to learn it well.

Interestingly, from what I've heard, India and Singapore do not experience similar problems. Maybe someone else can shed light on this?
In Japanese schools, students are taught English grammar a lot, but little Japanese grammar. Consequently some of the (brightest) students tend to analyze and describe Japanese sentences along the concepts of English grammar.

In England, too, it's usual for your first in-depth experience of grammar to occur during the learning of a second language. Then you re-apply what you've learnt about French or Spanish or German to your own language.

MrP
(How do I quote? I don't see the "quote" button)

My secondary school made us learn Chinese grammar as part of our O-level preparation. Totally pointless exercise. What was the point of learning to apply terminology back to Chinese sentences that I know by heart?

And yes, I see the influence of English on Chinese. Chinglish (Chinese-style English) and "Chengese" (English-style Chinese) cause quite a bit of consternation among grammarians.

A few days ago, I got an email from an English tutorial school owner, who mistook something I posted on a forum to be "Chinglish" -- English formulated along Chinese language patterns. I asked him which Chinese pattern he was referring to, and as it turned out, that very pattern was borrowed from English!
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Have you seen this thread, Julielai?

Have you seen this thread, Julielai?

Hope this works.

What do the Japanese grammarians say about the "Anglicization" of Japanese, Paco-san?