In the St. Paul Pioneer Press last Sunday, in the cartoon section, appeared an article on Lithuania in the educational cartoon *World of Wonder.* It contained the following segment about the Lithuanian language:
(quote)
Everyday expressions
English Lithuanian (pronunciation)
Hello Sveiki (svy-kee)
Goodbye Viso gero (vee-saw geh-raw)
Yes Taip (tape)
No Ne (neh)
Please Pras^au (prah-shau) (Here "s^" represents an "s" with a circumflex.)
Thank you Dekoju (dair-kaw-you)
(emd quote)
I found a couple of the pronunciation spellings to be odd, namely the "au" to represent the vowel at the end of "pras^au" and the "air" to represent the vowel in "dekoju." If the "au" is intended to represent /aU/, the diphthong of "how," it would usually be represented in pronunciation spelling as "ow." In addition to those two puzzling usages, if "geh" is meant to represent the "soft 'g,'" it would have seemed more natural to me to write "jeh" to represent the syllable in question.

The article said that "Lithuanian is an Indo-European language that can be traced back to ancient Sanskrit." I take this to mean that Lithuanian is descended from Sanskrit. The Indo-European language "family tree" at

http://www.ethnologue.com/show family.asp?subid=629

shows no such relationship.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
1 2 3
Hello Sveiki (svy-kee)

And just what sound are they meaning by "y"?
I found a couple of the pronunciation spellings to be odd, namely the "au" to represent the vowel at the end of "pras[/nq]^au" and the "air" to represent
the vowel in "dekoju." If the "au" is intended to represent /aU/, the diphthong of "how," it would usually be represented in pronunciation spelling as "ow."

That would be ambiguous. Could just as well rhyme with "low".

Perhaps "ou" as in "house", "oa" as in "boat"?
In addition to those two puzzling usages, if "geh" is meant to represent the "soft 'g,'" it would have seemed more natural to me to write "jeh" to represent the syllable in question.

"g" in any pronunciation spelling would imply a hard "g" to me. Which is the real pronunciation? And what sound are they meaning by "eh" exactly?

Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
^au" and the "air" torepresent
the vowel in "dekoju." If the "au" is intended to ... it would usually be represented in pronunciation spelling as "ow."

That would be ambiguous. Could just as well rhyme with "low". Perhaps "ou" as in "house", "oa" as in "boat"?

Pronunciation spelling is a big headache. To me, "au" suggests no English vowel and the combination "ow" can indeed be ambiguous. The combination "oh," however, is unambiguously /oU/ (or in Received Pronunciation, /@U/), as in the vowel pronounced in "home."
In addition to those two puzzling usages, if "geh" is ... tome to write "jeh" to represent the syllable in question.

"g" in any pronunciation spelling would imply a hard "g" to me. Which is the real pronunciation? And what sound are they meaning by "eh"exactly?

According to
http://www.angelfire.com/mo/Lith/alpha.html
"g" in Lithuanian is hard. By the way, the language doesn't use a circumflex but a hacek (an accent which looks like an upside-down circumflex).

I figure the authors of the article used "eh" as I would, to indicate /E/, the vowel in "bed" and "head." I am aware that some English-speakers, particularly some Canadians, see "eh" and think /e/, the vowel in the French word "été," but that use of "eh" seems very strange to me.
Stewart. My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Pronunciation spelling is a big headache. To me, "au" suggests no English vowel

To me, it suggests /O:/. Cause, haunt, automatic..
I figure the authors of the article used "eh" as I would, to indicate /E/, the vowel in "bed" and ... and think /e/, the vowel in the French word "été," but that use of "eh" seems very strange to me.

Or the interjection "eh", pronounced /eI/ over here.

But you're probably right. As if "e" by itself isn't good enough....

Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
Please Pras[/nq]^au (prah-shau)
(Here "s[/nq]^" represents an "s" with a circumflex.)
Thank you Dekoju (dair-kaw-you) (emd quote) I found a couple of the pronunciation spellings to be odd, namely the "au" to represent the vowel at the end of "pras[/nq]^au" and the "air" to
represent the vowel in "dekoju." If the "au" is intended to represent /aU/, the diphthong of "how,"

Pardon? (&w), not (aw), is the diphthong in 'how'. Are you saying that phonemically it's /aw/?
it would usually be represented in pronunciation spelling as "ow."

'ow' can be (aw), (ow), or (&w), and 'au' can be ([email protected]), (O), (o), (ow), (aw), or (&w), imho. But, as another poster pointed out, anything can be anything, pretty much.
Michael Hamm
AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis
(Email Removed) Standard disclaimers: http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ ... legal.html

Hello Sveiki (svy-kee)

That's not quite right. More like "sveyki".
And just what sound are they meaning by "y"?

I found a couple of the pronunciation spellings to be odd, namely the "au" to represent the vowel at the end of "pras[/nq]^au" and the
"air" to represent the vowel in "dekoju." If the "au" ... it would usually be represented in pronunciation spelling as "ow."

That would be ambiguous. Could just as well rhyme with "low". Perhaps "ou" as in "house", "oa" as in "boat"?

I don't know Lithuanian, but there are similarites with Latvian, which I do know. I don't know the words shown above.
In addition to those two puzzling usages, if "geh" is ... me to write "jeh" to represent the syllable in question.

"g" in any pronunciation spelling would imply a hard "g" to me. Which is the real pronunciation? And what sound are they meaning by "eh" exactly?

It is a hard "g", as far as I know. The "eh" would be a long (in duration) "e" as in "beta", except with no trace of a diphthong.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Raymond S. Wise wrote, in part:
The article said that "Lithuanian is an Indo-European language that can be traced back to ancient Sanskrit." I take this to mean that Lithuanian is descended from Sanskrit. The Indo-European language "family tree" at http://www.ethnologue.com/show family.asp?subid=629 shows no such relationship.

Right, but I have read the Sanskrit allegations also. I have no idea what might or might not be correct.

Skitt (AUE's token Latvian)
Please Pras[/nq]^au (prah-shau)
(Here "s[/nq]^" represents an "s" with a circumflex.)
Thank you Dekoju (dair-kaw-you) (emd quote) I found a couple ... "au" to represent the vowel at the end of "pras[/nq]^au" and the "air" to
represent the vowel in "dekoju." If the "au" is intended to represent /aU/, the diphthong of "how,"

Pardon? (&w), not (aw), is the diphthong in 'how'. Are you saying that phonemically it's /aw/?

The Collins English Dictionary at
http://www.wordreference.com/definition/how.htm
and the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary at

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?dict=CALD&key=38269&ph=on

which use the International Phonetic Alphabet, use /aU/ (that is, the IPA equivalent of those ASCII IPA symbols) for the diphthong in "how."

In IPA, diphthongs are indicated by using two vowels. Semiconsonants (/j/ and /w/) are not used. (Why that should be, I don't know, but I read that specific rule in a book by amateur linguist Anthony Burgess and later saw it given in a book by linguist David Crystal.)
it would usually be represented in pronunciation spelling as "ow."

I'm not entirely sure what vowel you intend when you write Emotion: dog. In Kirshenbaum's ASCII IPA at
http://www.kirshenbaum.net/IPA/ascii-ipa.pdf
which is the version used in these newsgroups, Emotion: dog, /&/, is the vowel in "hand" and "cat." I don't think I've ever heard a dialect of English in which "ow" is pronounced /&U/.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Pardon? (&w), not (aw), is the diphthong in 'how'. Are you saying that phonemically it's /aw/?

I'm not entirely sure what vowel you intend when you write Emotion: dog. In Kirshenbaum's ASCII IPA , Emotion: dog, /&/, is the vowel in "hand" and "cat."

That's the one I meant.
I don't think I've ever heard a dialect of English in which "ow" is pronounced /&U/.

I pronounce that way in many words (though not in the interjection 'ow'). No time now to list; perhaps later.
Michael Hamm
AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis
(Email Removed) Standard disclaimers: http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ ... legal.html
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more