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Hi

Mr X is a professor in exercise science at Brigham Young University in Hawaii. For more than 20 years, he has taught anatomy, kinesiology, exercise physiology, and athletic conditioning, and for 35 years he has coached track and field. His research revolved around the acute and chronic effects of stretching. He earned his PhD in exercise physiology from ...

1. Is "exercise science" something like "physical education"? So he holds a professor degree in physical education?

2. What is it "athletic conditioning"? Is there a similar term for that?

3. OK, track and field is athletics, right?

4. Does it mean that while studying he conducted research on how too much stretching (acute/chronic) affects the muscles?

thanks
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Newguest He earned his PhD in exercise physiology from ...

Every time someone makes up a new course, they have to make up a name for it. It's like new grammatical structures. If the name catches on, so does the course. Next thing you know, somebody offers a PHD in it.
I have an acquaintance who holds a PHD in "Ethnomusic." Geez! There must be money in education.

1. Is "exercise science" something like "physical education"? So he holds a professor degree in physical education? No. Physical education (Phys Ed) has been understood throughout my lifetime as a course in which students pro-actively attend to their general physical deficiencies, with an eye toward achieving an adaquate sense of physical well-being in their daily lives.
When someone gets a degree in Physical Education, it's a degree in teaching Physical education, not a degree in being buff.
I'd say that "exercise physiology" and "exercise science" are synonymous. I believe physiology is a branch of biology (which is a science), although the word seems to get used in various ways. In this case, I'd say it's the study of the relationship between exercise and the body, or its various systems.

2. What is it "athletic conditioning"? Is there a similar term for that? It's simply the name of a course he taught. You'd have to read the course description. It could be a course for athletes or it could be a course for coaches. It could be approached as a science, or it could be approached as an activity. Not all courses with the same name are the same.

3. OK, track and field is athletics, right? Right. It's typically those events which made up the Summer Olympics before they added baseball and waterboarding and all that stuff. (high jump, broad jump, running, javelin, discus, pole vault. Not baseball and football and hockey.)Emotion: big smile

4. Does it mean that while studying he conducted research on how too much stretching (acute/chronic) affects the muscles? Yes. PHD's in the sciences typically involve research, where a PHD in English would involve a doctoral thesis.
Note that when we say "the chronic and acute effects of stretching," the adjectives modify "effects," not "stretching." So although "too much stretching" may be implied, it's not stated.

Newguest Maybe by "athletic conditioning" he means "theory of training"? So he was teraching a theory of training? I believe you're correct.
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Maybe by "athletic conditioning" he means "theory of training"? So he was teraching a theory of training?
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 Avangi's reply was promoted to an answer.
I thought to myself that maybe "exercise science" means "scientific bases of exercises/exercising"?

Surely, and why shouldn't it? And so does "exercise psysiology"!

Boy! - once this yellow snow creeps into the thread, it takes a lot of concentration to figure out the true order of the posts!
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Thank you for your help Avangi!
Hi again

I thought to myself today that maybe I could call it (exercise science) a "movement recreation".

So, Mr X is a professor of movement recreation????