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1) I encountered this sentence in Harry Potter:

"There was a great road from the motorbike and Harry felt the sidecar give a nasty lurch"

Why give can go with felt here?

2) In my SAT preparation, I encounter this problem:

"The whopping crane population has increased from only 15 to about 2 hundred, which is one of conservation's most encouraging stories

A) which is one of conservation's most encouraging stories

b) which is one of the most encouraging stories in conservation

c) and this one of conservation's most encouraging stories

d) and this growth is one of conservation's most encouraging stories

E) and that appears to be encouraging to conservationists

The answer is D. But I don't still get it, which stand after a comma can subtitute for the clause which comes before it, why can't it be the correct answer here? And the answer book also says that: The act of changing which to this does not solve the problem of a pronoun's lack of specific antecedent. I don't get the whole thing

3) I came in 15 minutes late which made the whole class difficult to understand

A) I came in 15 mintues late, and this

B) coming in fifteen minutes late

B is the correct answer. But why not a? They say: The pronounce "which" has no specific antecedent here, and the change of which to this does not correct the problem.... Why???
Comments  
1) Perfectly good English:
http://books.google.com/books?q=%22felt+*+heart+give%22&btnG=Search+Books
2) What they mean is that "which" should replace a clear word in the preceding part of the sentence, and that doesn't exist here, thus they first create in D that word "the growth" which shows up clearly as a subject for the 2nd part of the sentence.
3) The original cannot be separated in two distinct independent sentences, while A can be, esp with the comma.
I'm sorry, but it has to be "gave", doesn't it?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
No, it must be "give."

It's "felt the car (to) give" but "to" has been lost in time ... Thus it's an atemporal, infinitive form.
Similar/equivalent to:

"felt the car giving a jolt"
Belly"There was a great road from the motorbike and Harry felt the sidecar give a nasty lurch"

Why give can go with felt here?
See Bare Infinitive usage

CJ
Hi,

refer back to the question again, I've seen which represent the whole clause which comes before it:

He got married again a year later, which surprised everybody
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I posted your question 2 to another forum. Here's an answer from the moderator:

Perhaps it helps.
Hi Jery, thanks so much for helping me, according to http://thegrammarexchange.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/340600179/m/4441002074 , he believes stories is the problem, not about which or that, so I believe the answer of the book is somewhat off the mark