Dear all,
Please help me with the following questions. Thank you very much!
1. Sometimes, I heard people say " health food", but sometimes Iheard people say "healthy food". I feel confused. Which one is correct? Thank you!
2. I read an article where it said " I agree with her idea." But Ipersonally prefer to saying " I agree "to" her idea." Which one is correct? Thank you.
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[nq:1]1. Sometimes, I heard people say " health food", but sometimes I heard people say "healthy food". I feel confused. Which one is correct?
The term "health food" usually means food characteristically eaten by people especially interested in health but typically not much eaten by others, because unusual: something like carrot juice might be an example. Food that is widely eaten by the general public that is held to be conducive to good health is not usually called "health food", but some might include it within the class.
Food that is likely to make or keep its eaters in good health is rightly referred to as "healthful", but is commonly mis-called "healthy". It is the people who eat it who are (presumably) healthy, not the food.
2. I read an article where it said " I agree with her idea." But I personally prefer to saying " I agree "to" her idea." Which one is correct?

They mean two somewhat different things. To agree with* means to hold the same opinion, to concur. To agree *to means to willingly comply with, follow out.

Cordially,
Eric Walker, Owlcroft House
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1. Sometimes, I heard people say " health food", but sometimes I heard people say "healthy food". I feel confused. Which one is correct?

The term "health food" usually means food characteristically eaten by people especially interested in health but typically not much eaten ... "healthful", but is commonly mis-called "healthy". It is the people who eat it who are (presumably) healthy, not the food.

"Healthy" has meant "conducive to or promoting health; wholesome, salubrious; salutary" since the 16th century. I see nothing wrong with it.

James
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Dear all, =A0 =A0 =A0 Please help me with the following questions. =A0Thank you ver=y much! 1. =A0Sometimes, I heard people say " health food", but sometimes I heard people say "healthy food". =A0I feel confused. =A0Which one is correct? =A0Thank you!

Health food is a label some people use to encourage others to eat stuff they would ordinarily avoid. It'll probably contain a variety of nuts, some scanky looking dried bits of fruit and unprocessed cereals (oats, wheat, corn). It could also contain something dreadful, like say, yoghurt, fresh fruit and vegetables and uncontaiminated meat products.
Others, on the other hand will sarcastically refer to health food as a pint or two of Guinness, or a fast food take)away.

Healthy food however sounds a bit odd. A chicken before slaughter should be healthy, but at that walking-around-still-very-much-alive stage the chicken would not ordinarily be referred to as food. So Healthy food probably refers to something which is not contaminated.
2. =A0I read an article where it said " =A0I agree with her idea." =A0 Bu=t I personally prefer to saying " I agree "to" her idea." =A0 =A0Which one is correct? =A0Thank you.

"I agree with..." primarily outlines that you agree with the person. You wouldn't say, "I agree to her", you'd say "I agree with her". "Agree to.." applies when you are agreeing to do something, so in this case it would fit if you say "I agree to do as she suggests" Or you might even say "I agree to her being allowed in for now" There, you would again be agreeing with an action rather agreeing with a person about agreeing on an action.
1. Sometimes, I heard people say " health food", but sometimes I heard people say "healthy food". I feel confused. Which one is correct? Thank you!

Your confusion (which is common) occurs because of two linguistic domains (marketing and journalism) that overlap within the general field of everyday English. The language often pairs nouns together in order to link two ideas, e.g. football pools, swimming costume, swap file and so on. Modern marketers now want to sell us things called health food, fashion shoes, sports bras and so on, and these noun pairs linger in the memory. Newspapermen and broadcasters nowadays deal with marketing and fashion as often as (formerly) with legislation and political debate, thus reinforce the trend. But the word health is still used differently by a nurse and by someone trying to sell you sugar-water.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Please help me with the following questions. Thank you very much! 1. Sometimes, I heard people say " health food", ... But I personally prefer to saying " I agree "to" her idea." Which one is correct? Thank you.

1. A "healthy food" is any food that sustains the body but does not containan excessive quantity of salt, fat, or substances that are likely to contribute to cholesterol deposition in the arteries. Examples are fruit, most vegetables, fish, meat if eaten in small quantities, etc. Contrast this with "unhealthy" foods such as pizzas (too much salt), chips (too much fat), etc.
Now, "health food". Most towns in Britain have at least one "Health Food Shop". These usually do not sell vegetables, fruit, and other degradables. But they do sell a range of foods that they claim are "healthy". Packets of cereals that contain bran. Yeast for making your own bread. Aids to slimming. They also sell bottles of vitamin pills, cod liver oil, and herbal remedies. Their range, they assert, is "health foods". The only thing I ever buy from one of these shops is occasional yeast. Otherwise, in my opinion, they are all just hyperchondromarkets.
2. "I agree with her idea" = I believe she is right. But this might be intheory only. I might, or might not, put her idea into practical operation.

She says that she thinks my house is worth £250,000 I agree with her. The idea seems to be sound, theoretically. I do nothing more about it.

"I agree to her idea" = I might, or might not, believe that she is right. But, whether she is right or wrong, I shall put her idea into practical operation.
I advertise my house at £250,000
She (a different "she") offers £200,000
I say that I will not accept a penny less than £235,000 She offers £225,000
Reluctantly, I agree to her offer. (Notice the word "to"). The selling of the house is put into practical operation.

Richard Chambers Leeds UK.
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L.C. Yiu:
1. Sometimes, I heard people say " health food", but sometimes I heard people say "healthy food". I feel confused. Which one is correct? Thank you!

Both are correct, but they mean different things. "Healthy food" refers to food that is good to eat for health reasons. "Health food" is food that is marketed as being especially good to eat for health reasons, which you might buy at a "health food store" specifializing in this.
2. I read an article where it said " I agree with her idea." But I personally prefer to saying " I agree "to" her idea." Which one is correct? Thank you.

Both are correct, but they mean different things. "Agree with" means you have the same opinion as her. "Agree to" means you consent to what she suggests; it usually refers to actions rather than ideas. ("I agree to pay for the supplies if you will do the work.")
Mark Brader, Toronto > "Winning isn't everything, but not trying to win (Email Removed) > is less than nothing." Anton van Uitert

My text in this article is in the public domain.
[nq:1]Now, "health food". Most towns in Britain have at least one "Health Food Shop".
AmE: "health food store" (The shop/store variation, as the original poster, Icy, may already know, is an expected difference between American and British varieties of English).
These usually do not sell vegetables, fruit, and other degradables. But they do sell a range of foods that they ... I ever buy from one of these shops is occasional yeast. Otherwise, in my opinion, they are all just hyperchondromarkets.

American ones might sell organic produce.
Many of the things they sell are now sold in ordinary supermarkets. When I was a youth in southern California (home of many of the original health food stores) this was definitely not the case.

Roland Hutchinson
He calls himself "the Garden State's leading violist da gamba," ... comparable to being ruler of an exceptionally small duchy. Newark (NJ) Star Ledger (URL removed)
...the original poster, Icy...

Roland, if you're not making a joke you either need a better monitor, a better screen font, or better glasses.

Mark Brader, Toronto > "Common sense isn't any more common on Usenet (Email Removed) > than it is anywhere else." Henry Spencer
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