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Hello!

Can you please tell me if the following sentences could be correct in any way? If so, why? ( The bold part is the critical aspect.)

1. John isn't in. He is going to the pictures although he has been twice this week.

I know "he has gone" would probably be better, but isn't "is going" also possible? (he may be on his way?)

2. The film I have just seen is about a lost continent that remains a mystery up to the present day.

has remained is the only option?

3. What are we doing if the monster comes round the corner?

4. His behavious annoys me very much. He talks all the time.

5. Why are you late again?

Another topic:

Each engaging chapter goes on to different practical actions we can each take to understand an unleash our own potential to think differently.

goes on to describe is probably much better. But can't the sentence also be understood in the way that the chapter goes on to < what it goes on to, substantive, is inserted>?

Thanks ever so much!
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'iF so'
Swiss JakeHello!

Can you please tell me if the following sentences could be correct in any way? If so, why? ( The bold part is the critical aspect.)

1. John isn't in. He is going to the pictures although he has been twice this week.

I know "he has gone" would probably be better, but isn't "is going" also possible? (he may be on his way?) Your distinction makes sense.

2. The film I have just seen is about a lost continent that remains a mystery up to the present day.

has remained is the only option? 'has remained' is better than 'remains', but the latter is also o.k.

3. What are we doing if the monster comes round the corner? Could also be 'what will we do'

4. His behavious annoys me very much. He talks all the time. This is fine.

5. Why are you late again? This is fine.

Another topic:

Each engaging chapter goes on to different practical actions we can each take to understand an unleash our own potential to think differently.

goes on to describe is probably much better. But can't the sentence also be understood in the way that the chapter goes on to < what it goes on to, substantive, is inserted>? Your suggestion is correct. 'different' could also be replaced by 'a variety of..'.

Thanks ever so much!

What exactly you want in the way of a response is a bit vague because of the way you have arranged your post. I hope my comments have helped, however.
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Swiss JakeHello!

Can you please tell me if the following sentences could be correct in any way? If so, why? ( The bold part is the critical aspect.)

1. John isn't in. He is going to the pictures although he has been twice this week.

I know "he has gone" would probably be better, but isn't "is going" also possible? (he may be on his way?)>> the present progressive is possible, but present perfect is better. If he just left, I would say "He is on his way to the movies." (Americans would say "movies", not "pictures")

2. The film I have just seen is about a lost continent that remains a mystery up to the present day.>> It's OK, but present perfect is better.

has remained is the only option?

3. What are we doing if the monster comes round the corner? >> No. "should we do" is conditional (if-clause follows)

4. His behaviours annoys me very much. He talks all the time. >> OK.

5. Why are you late again? >> OK.

Another topic:

Each engaging chapter goes on to different practical actions we can each take to understand an (and?) unleash our own potential to think differently.

goes on to describe is probably much better. But can't the sentence also be understood in the way that the chapter goes on to < what it goes on to, substantive, is inserted>?

It is a very awkward sentence, not written very well. Here is a slightly better version:
Each engaging chapter goes on to describe different practical actions that each of us could take to understand and unleash our potential to think differently.

Thanks for all the answers. I am still impressed by the speed with which one gets replies on this forum!

These sentences are from a test, where I was supposed to complete a text with the correct form in one of the following tesnes: present simple/ present continuous/ present perfect.
No other tenses may be used.

My given examples were marked as incorrect. However, an explanation/justification could not be given to me.

So, in sentence 3. "should we" is not possible (in matters of this test) because the verb forms given were: (we to be) (do)

It may be: What are we to do if the monster comes round the corner?

Is that better then "are we doing" and more importantly is "are we doing" incorrect?

4. His behaviours annoys me very much. He talks all the time.

Neither do I see here how that'd be incorrect. Maybe: "He is talking all the time." ?
But since he does it all the time, it could be a habit, thus not continuous?

5. Why are you late again?

Here she said that was wrong and "Why are you being late again" Is the correct form

The sentecne is longer though:

Whenever I am late my mother looks annoyed and says - Why are you/ are you being late again?

I don't see how that'd would change the concept though.

Thank you,
Jake
The downside of a busy forum is, your thread gets lost Emotion: smile
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3. I don't see how this could be answered using the 3 tenses that you quote - "what are we to do" would work.

4. I agree with you. If it's just a momentary thing it would be "John's behaviour is annoying me very much. He is talking all the time". Because it's "Johns behaviour annoys...." it's habitual.

5. Your teacher is just plain wrong!
Swiss JakeThese sentences are from a test, where I was supposed to complete a text with the correct form in one of the following tesnes: present simple/ present continuous/ present perfect.
No other tenses may be used.
SJ:
It certainly would help the teachers if you gave the "rules" in the original post! Emotion: surprise

Sentence #3 then would be obvious:
Whar do we do (or are we to do) if the monster...

Sentence #4 is less obvious, but the context makes all the difference! The subordinate clause changes the verb form of the main clause.This form is correct - Whenever I am late my mother looks annoyed and says - Why are you being late again?
The reason is that "Why are you late again?" is one question asked at one particular time - For example, I came in an hour late to work today and my boss asked me: This is the third time this week, why are you late again?
Why are you being late again - means a habitual behavior, and fits with the "whenever" clause, which refers to many times, or the person's character of being late, not one specific instance.
Thanks for all answers.
oh, wow. I didn't think that it would make such a difference. My excuses!

So, in sentence 5 "Why are you late again?" cannot be correct?
I mean, the mother could just as well ask "why are you late AGAIN?", like the boss would? (The scenario could be that the daughter had been late the day before and then promised she wouldn't be late again (tomorrow), but came late yet again only the next day, the mother would then look at her and say "Why are you late (yet) again?!" with emphasis on the again)

Sentence 4 is still correct with the "he TALKS all the time?"
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