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Hi everyone!
The book “English Grammar In Use. Intermediate Students, Cambridge University Press” tells us:
The following verbs are not NORMALLY used in Continues Tenses (using the “ing” form of the verb), although you can form the gerund with them:
To like, to love, to hate, to want, to need, to prefer, to know, to realize, to suppose, to suggest, to mean, to understand, to believe, to remember, to belong to, to contain, to consist, to depend, to seem, to promise, to apologize, to advise, to insist, to agree, to refuse. And the verbs of perception: to see, to hear, to smell, to taste, to feel.

How do I should consider the word “normally” used in capitals by the book? Please, consider these situations written in Continuous (using the “ing” form of the verb):
1.- Cannot I say:
a.- “Are you suggesting that my friend Benny is a liar”
b.- “You’re insisting too much on that!”
c.- “Are they refusing my offer?”
d.- “I’m preferring now white T-shirts more than black ones”
e.- “Are you advising me?”
f.- “Are you seeing me?”; “Are you hearing they?” (instead of Can you see me?; Can you hear me?)
g.- “I’m feeling that I cannot learn English without English Forums”

2.- I have first met Sarah two months ago. But day by day, I realize I don’t like Sarah for several reasons. Cannot I say “You know what Sarah; I’m knowing you day by day”? (As a ironic form of talking) (Maybe there is in English another form to say the same ironic sentence –and I would like to know it: a friend says that “I can know you day by day”-, but you please concentrate in my question about the use of “knowing”. If that use is not NORMAL but acceptable, say in literature). Or: “I’m hating you more and more every day”
If the point is: They CANNOT be used in Continuous Tenses, then why the word NORMALLY and not to say: “Don’t use the following verbs in Continuous Tenses”

3.- I have first met Sarah two months ago. But day by day, I realize I’m falling in love with her. Cannot I say “You know what Sarah; I’m loving you day by day”?

Please, help.
Eladio
Comments  
Most likely, "not normally used ..." means there is not often a need to use these forms. When used they would have some extraordinary or idiosyncratic meaning.

a.- “Are you suggesting that my friend Benny is a liar?" OK
b.- “You’re insisting too much on that!” OK (?)
c.- “Are they refusing my offer?” OK (?)
d.- “I’m preferring now white T-shirts more than black ones” No. Definitely not.
e.- “Are you advising me?” Possibly - sounds like a challenge, very confrontational, defiant.
f.- “Are you seeing me?”; “Are you hearing they?<” (instead of Can you see me?; Can you hear me?) No. Definitely not.
g.- “I’m feeling that I cannot learn English without English Forums” No.

2. - 3. "I'm [getting / starting / beginning] to [know / like / love / hate] you more every day." is the sort of thing you want, I think.

CJ
Hello CJ

I am interested in Eladio's questions and your answers,because I also have troubles in "abnormal" usages of progressive tenses. Could you help me by giving additional answers?
a.- “Are you suggesting that my friend Benny is a liar?" OK

I understand "suggest" is a momentary verb. So when the subject is a person, the progressive present is more natural than the simple present. For example, "What are you suggesting?" is more natural than "What do you suggest?". But when a thing comes to the subject position, the simple tense sounds more natural. For example, "What does your talk suggest?" is more natural than "What is your talk suggesting?". I understand this is because that when the subject is a thing, "suggest" is used to mean its nature rather than its action. I mean the difference "You are suggesting something" and "It suggests something" is just like the difference between "He is drinking" and "He drinks". The former describes the subject's action and the latter describes the subject's nature. Do you think these understandings of mine are right?
b.- “You’re insisting too much on that!” OK (?)
c.- “Are they refusing my offer?” OK (?)
e.- “Are you advising me?” very confrontational

I interpret these sentences as indicating speaker's emotion, irritation or anger in these cases. Am I right?
d.- “I’m preferring now white T-shirts more than black ones” No. Definitely not. d.- “I’m preferring now white T-shirts more than black ones” No. Definitely not.

Eladio's example sounds weird to you. But how about "As I get older, I'm preferring a country life to a town life"? I think we can use verbs of emotion in a progressive form when we want to emphasize a transitional or developmental sense. Am I wrong?
g.- “I’m feeling that I cannot learn English without English Forums” No.

I think Eladio wanted to express a gradually developing feeling by this. I cannot say whether this sentence is good or bad, but I think we can say like "Are you feeling better this morning" or "I am liking this new job" to emphasize a development of feeling. Is this understanding right?
f.- “Are you seeing me?”; “Are you hearing me? (instead of Can you see me?; Can you hear me?) No. Definitely not.

Usually verbs of perception connote passive experiences. But sometimes they can connote active activities. "Are you seeing the doctor tomorrow?" (see a medical doctor = consult a medical doctor), "Are you seeing the woman tomorrow?" (see = have a rendezvous), "Are you hearing me better now?" (a conversation in testing a hearing aid). I think those sentences would sound natural to you. Right?

paco
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Paco,

By and large it seems to me that you have a good instinct for these turns of phrase. I think your analysis of such structures as "These actions [suggest / *are suggesting] ..." is quite accurate.

Your ideas about emotion, anger, or irritation are also quite right for the progressive forms in question.

Your example with "preferring" is very borderline. I'm not warming up to it! I would still use simply "prefer" or "am beginning to prefer" in a case like that.

"Are you feeling better?" is quite common to show a (possibly gradual) change of state, but "I am liking ..." leaves me cold! Again, my preference is "I'm beginning to like ...".

In the contexts you describe for "see" and "hear", yes, the progressive is possible and common. Note that in the case of "see", the meaning of "see" changes almost completely from something visual to something social, i.e., "meeting", "visiting".

Jim
Hello CJ

Thank you for your compliment. How to use English progressive constructs properly is still a problem to me. I have to consult with dictionaries and grammar books every time I use them.

paco
Thank you, CJ for your answers and Paco for his comments. My conclusions:
1.- The use of constinuous/progressive tenses is controversial, at least with the verbs I listed.
2.- I have to study much more about this. This is "still a problem to me".
Could anyone else help with comments and examples? PLEASE!!
Eladio
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Hi!
Please, see what I have found in the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English by the word “get”:
“17) get to see/know/understand etc.: to gradually begin to see, know, understand etc. Example: I'm sure the kids will soon get to like each other”

This is, from my point of view, the solution to my questions about those verbs I listed and its use in Continuous Tenses. And that means that examples given by CalifJim were very appropriate.
Eladio