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Hi everyone,
I've studied American English with some audio books and I learnt some useful rules.
But sometimes with some words, I really get confused how to pronounce.

For example, a native American English speaker doesn't pronounce the first "t" letter in the word "internet" right? Because there's an "n" sound before it.
Okay, but what about "content"?
There are two "t"s that you shouldn't pronounce.
Should I pronounce at least one of them or none of them? It sounds kinda strange when I don't make the t sounds.
I'm gonna keep writing some other words that I will have difficulty in pronunciation. 
Thanks!
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Comments  (Page 3) 
trhutchins3Someone's going to nail me by saying "It's fairly standard." My rebuttal is that sometimes standard practices are wrong. By cheapening our language, we are curtailing advancement.
I'm afraid your hand-wringing over the decline and fall of Western civilization puts you in the minority these days where grammatical theory is concerned! Emotion: smile

I recommend you read up on "prescriptive" and "descriptive" linguistics. It could be an eye-opener! Emotion: smile

Nobody's trying to "nail you", by the way. We're pretty tolerant of various viewpoints on this site. Emotion: smile

CJ
Hi CaliJim,

I recently learned about stop sounds.

- What number is it?

- Eight.

Could you tell me if you pronounce "t" as in "eight", where you let the "t" sound out?

- I saw eight men jump:

Could you tell me if it's right to place your tongue in position but only you do not let the "t" sound out, and get ready for "m" in "men"?

Thank you.

Tinanam
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tinanam0102- What number is it?
- Eight.
Could you tell me if you pronounce "t" as in "eight", where you let the "t" sound out?
I do not pronounce a full "t" where "t" is utterance-final. I use an unreleased "t". (American English)
tinanam0102- I saw eight men jump:
Could you tell me if it's right to place your tongue in position but only you do not let the "t" sound out, and get ready for "m" in "men"?
Again, I use an unreleased "t", which you describe as not letting out the "t" sound.

See How to pronounce a 't' in American English for some very detailed material on the pronunciation of "t" in American English.

CJ
Hi CalifJim,

My niece is around 17 mouth, and I was surprised when she said "eighT". No one taught her except her parents play a lot of English lessons while feeding her. I suspect they are produced by Great Britian.

When you say American English, does that mean British people pronunce "eight" differently?

Thank you.

Tinanam
As far as I know, there are four common ways to pronounce a final /t/ in English.
  1. Normal (the degree of aspiration can vary): [tʰ]
  2. Tapped (like a quick [ d ], only when it's followed by another vowel): [ɾ]
  3. Unreleased (the tongue touches the roof like a normal [t], but no air comes out): [t̚]
  4. Glottal stop (the tip of the tongue doesn't move at all): [ʔ]
I think all of them occur in both American and British English, depending on the speaker, the situation, the dialect, etc. There is also some "free variation", which means native speakers are not always consistent in the way they pronounce that /t/.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
tinanam0102Could you tell me if you pronounce "t" as in "eight", where you let the "t" sound out?
The number eight is pronounced like the past tense verb ate.
Hi Kooyeen, hi trhutchins3,

Thank you for the details you gave.

Tinanam
tinanam0102When you say American English, does that mean British people pronunce "eight" differently?
I include that information about American English because that's the way I say it, and I can't speak for the British. I often don't know for certain how they pronounce things. I would have to guess. I suspect that the British tend to pronounce aspirated T's in more situations than we Americans do. The differences are not dramatic, however, and we understand each other quite well even though our T's are not pronounced exactly the same!

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hi CalifJim,

Thanks for your further comment.

Have a great day.

Tinanam
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