+0
Hi everyone,
I've studied American English with some audio books and I learnt some useful rules.
But sometimes with some words, I really get confused how to pronounce.

For example, a native American English speaker doesn't pronounce the first "t" letter in the word "internet" right? Because there's an "n" sound before it.
Okay, but what about "content"?
There are two "t"s that you shouldn't pronounce.
Should I pronounce at least one of them or none of them? It sounds kinda strange when I don't make the t sounds.
I'm gonna keep writing some other words that I will have difficulty in pronunciation. 
Thanks!
1 2 3 4
Comments  
Hi,
some t's can be left out, but not always. It tends to happen in words that are common, and when the following syllable is not stressed.

Internet: the main stress is on "in", and the secondary stress is on "net". The syllable following the "t" is not stressed.
Center: the main stress is on "cen".
The "t" is often dropped in these words.

In "content", there seem to be two stressed syllables (usually). The main stress is on "con", and the secondary stress is on "tent". That's why dropping the "t" doesn't sound good in this word.

These "rules" are not universal though. Not everyone drops those t's, and then there seem to be several exceptions. If I'm not mistaken, I heard that while lots of Americans drop the "t" in "twenty", they don't usually drop it in "ninety". Go figure.
Dropping T's is common in American slang, but not in formal pronunciation.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
trhutchins3Dropping T's is common in American slang
It has nothing to do with slang.
As far as I know, dropping T's is not related to informal or sloppy speech. It's standart American English.
I just asked if we drop the T's in the word "content".
TescoI just asked if we drop the T's in the word "content".
No, they are pronounced.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Neither of the T's is dropped. In fact, T's are rarely dropped in any standard English word; I can't think of a single example of when one is dropped.
I'm saying that pronunciations such as "twenty" without the second T are informal. Informal speech is, in a way, slang.
TescoFor example, a native American English speaker doesn't pronounce the first "t" letter in the word "internet" right? Because there's an "n" sound before it.
Okay, but what about "content"?
All the T's are usually pronounced in internet and content. You may occasionally hear "innernet", but my recommendation is not to imitate this pronunciation.

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more