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"I employ the term 'dogmatist' in the sense in which S. uses dogmatikos, namely, to designate someone who makes positive or negative assertions about the nature of things, on the basis of what they/he/the person consider/considers to be evidence and reasoned arguments and doctrines."

Which option should I use to refer back to "someone"?

Thanks
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Hi Sextus,

How about using 'one'?

ie "I employ the term 'dogmatist' in the sense in which S. uses dogmatikos, namely, to designate one who makes positive or negative assertions about the nature of things, on the basis of what one considers to be evidence and reasoned arguments and doctrines."

Do you feel you need the comma after 'things'? Perhaps a comma after 'evidence' rather than 'and'?

Is the term 'dogmatist' compatible with one who is influenced by doctrines?

Clive

Hi Clive, thanks for the answers.

"I employ the term 'dogmatist' in the sense in which S. uses dogmatikos, namely, to designate one who makes positive or negative assertions about the nature of things, on the basis of what one considers to be evidence and reasoned arguments and doctrines."

This may work, but I'm not completely sure that it's clear enough. In any case "he" and "they" may be used to refer to someone whose gender is not known. But I know there are people who dislike both usages.

Do you feel you need the comma after 'things'? Perhaps a comma after 'evidence' rather than 'and'?

Yes, I should remove that comma. Regarding "and", the point is that "reasoned" goes with both "arguments" and "doctrines."

Is the term 'dogmatist' compatible with one who is influenced by doctrines?

Yes, in its technical usage.

Cheers, Sextus
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Sextus"I employ the term 'dogmatist' in the sense in which S. uses dogmatikos, namely, to designate someone who makes positive or negative assertions about the nature of things, on the basis of what they/he/the person consider/considers to be evidence and reasoned arguments and doctrines."

Which option should I use to refer back to "someone"?

Thanks

Commonly, academic texts use "he".
Perhaps the best solution is to say "he or she", so no one will find it offensive (mostly feminists).
I don't think you can win with this one.

If you use "they", people who think they know about grammar will object. If you use "he", people who think they know about feminism will object. If you use "he or she", people who think they know about style will object.

Maybe: "...to designate those who...", followed by "they".

MrP
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Thanks P.

The problem is that dogmatikos is singular, so it sounds weird to me to say "those who". I think I'll stick to "he". Even if I hate feminists, I don't think this usage may be taken as evidence.
resisting the urge....resisting the urge.....Emotion: angry
Thanks for resisting (I know it must be hard... you're in your 40s).

Anyway, what do you think about the query of this thread, Nona? I mean, does it sound offensive to use "he"?
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