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Hello. I just want to make sure about something. Word has "sometime" as being a correctly spelled word. So is this right?:

"He was stuck there for quite sometime."

If a person were to say, "Call me some time," then I guess, in that case, it is correct for it to be two words. Am I right about this?

Thanks.
Comments  
Sometime = at some unspecified time
Some time (some is a determiner, modifying time) = quite a while / for an unspecified interval or period of time

Call me sometime.
He was stuck there for quite some time.

In less common contexts, some time can also mean some specific time: Choose some time that fits your schedule.
Aspara GusSometime = at some unspecified timeSome time (some is a determiner, modifying time) = quite a while / for an unspecified interval or period of timeCall me sometime.He was stuck there for quite some time.In less common contexts, some time can also mean some specific time: Choose some time that fits your schedule.
Well, then why do you say that it should be "...quite some time?" It's unspecified what the time period was that he was stuck there, so shouldn't it be "sometime?" "Quite a while," as it says in your "some time" definition, just means a long time? But what is that? It could be a day, a month, a year, etc.

Take this as another example:

"You don't think he should have discussed with her sometime, anytime, beforehand that he was planning on doing that?"

Should it be "sometime" or "some time?"
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I can help with these examples: 'We'll take a vacation sometime in October.' Our house was built sometime around 1900.
Sometime (also some time) (adv) at a time in the future or in the past, although you don't know exactly when.
Snarf"Quite a while," as it says in your "some time" definition, just means a long time?
Some time can mean for a considerably long time, but it can also mean for an unspecified time, as previously noted. To me, though, for quite some time seems to put more emphasis on duration, indicating that he was in fact stuck there for a long time. Either way, it has to be some time. Sometime means at an unspecified time, not for.
Snarf"You don't think he should have discussed with her sometime, anytime, beforehand that he was planning on doing that?"
Should it be "sometime" or "some time?"
Sometime.
So it's right to write, "I have to eat sometime today," since it's eating at a time, not for one, correct?
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That's right.