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Hello everyone!

I have a problem, I don't know what the difference between those two is!

I know when someone is leaving and you think he hasn't stayed long enough you say "So soon?" and not "So early?"
But, what if you want to write something like:

"Sorry for not giving you the information earlier" - Should it be "sooner" or "earlier"?

Thanks in advance!
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Hi,

I have a problem, I don't know what the difference between those two is!

I know when someone is leaving and you think he hasn't stayed long enough you say "So soon?" and not "So early?" Sounds OK.
But, what if you want to write something like:

"Sorry for not giving you the information earlier" - Should it be "sooner" or "earlier"? Both sound OK.


Sometimes, you can use either. But consider this example.

Mary's appointment with the doctor is at 6pm. At 7pm, she calls the doctor and says,

"I'm late. I'm very sorry. But I will be there soon.'

Pleasse post again if you need more explanation

Best wishes, Clive

Thanks for answering, Clive!Emotion: smile

So, there is not a rule for when to use each one?

What if Mary arrives at 5pm instead of at 6pm?

Should she say "I'm soon" or "I'm early"? I'm early sounds better but, "soon" also means "pronto"

Another thing, I can say "It's early in Canada, right?" - What if I said "It's soon in Canada, right?" Would it be wrong?
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Hi,

early before the due, usual, thought-of or expected time.

soon within a short period of time from now or from some some previously mentioned past time time.

Now let's look at your last examples.

What if Mary arrives at 5pm instead of at 6pm?

Should she say "I'm soon" or "I'm early"? I'm early sounds better but, "soon" also means "pronto"


She's early, because she has arrived before the expected time.

You can't say 'I'm soon' in any situation, because 'soon' is an adverb.


Another thing, I can say "It's early in Canada, right?" As long as I know 'earlier than when'. eg Earlier than the time that Canadians go to bed?

- What if I said "It's soon in Canada, right?" Would it be wrong? If you mean the same as the above example about Canadian bed-time, yes, it's wrong.

It depends on your meaning and on the context. eg On December 23rd, you migtht say 'Christmas is soon'. However, it'd be better to say 'It will soon be Christmas'.

Best wishes, Clive

I think I understand it now, thanks for your help! Emotion: left hug
''so soon?'' means ''so quickly?''
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Hi,

''so soon?'' means ''so quickly?''

I didn't think you would telephone me so soon. This means that I didn't think you would telephone me in such a short period of time from some previous time. eg perhaps from the time that I said 'Call me'.


I didn't think you would telephone me so quickly. This means that I didn't think you would use so much speed. eg maybe you ran to the nearest phone and called me.

Best wishes, Clive
This is probably a good example to understand the difference between fast and quick. Occasionally, I still have problem distinguishing between the two. Some say fast is related to speed while quick is related to time used. To me, time used and speed are related. The shorter the time spent the higher the speed is. So when you say quick, you mean fast.

But in this case,

I didn't think you would phone so fast. (sounds like the person dialed at a high speed)

Can anyone help me solve this fast-quick mystery?

Thanks

Sorry to interrupt. If needed, I can create a new thread. Your example just triggered this thought so I thought I should bring it up here.
New2grammar Some say fast is related to speed while quick is related to time used.

Hi,
That is right. I’m sure you know the story about the race between the rabbit and the turtle. The rabbit was faster than the turtle but the turtle finished the race quicker than the rabbit - right?
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