+1

"I'm leaving now, dude. Sorry for disturbing you./Sorry to disturb you."

"I'm leaving now, dude. Sorry for taking your time./Sorry to take your time."


The speaker has "disturbed" the dude and technically is still disturbing him as he hasn't left yet. Which one is natural (if any) in the two examples?

+0
anonymous

"I'm leaving now, dude. Sorry for disturbing you./Sorry to disturb you."

"I'm leaving now, dude. Sorry for taking your time./Sorry to take your time."


The speaker has "disturbed" the dude and technically is still disturbing him as he hasn't left yet. Which one is natural (if any)(if either) in the two examples?

The ones with 'sorry for' seem more natural to me in the given context.

CJ

+0
anonymous"I'm leaving now, dude. Sorry for disturbing you./Sorry to disturb you."

Either is correct.

anonymous"I'm leaving now, dude. Sorry for taking your time./Sorry to take your time."

Almost. say:

I'm leaving now, dude. Sorry for taking up your time.

or

I'm leaving now, dude. Sorry to take up your time.

We use "take your time" in a different way:

Take your time in getting dressed, we don't have to be at the party until tonight.

or

This is an important question, so take your time before answering me.