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Dear all,

I would like to know the meaning of the following sentences. I can't understand the meaning of the word "sort of".

1) I sort of like him.

2) She is sort of hungry.

Please see the following sentences. I would like to know what difference that "with" makes in the meaning of the sentences.

1) I met with your students yesterday.

2) I met your students yesterday.


Thank you.

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cat navy 425"sort of"

~ somewhat; slightly; moderately; a little

"sort of" suggests not completely, not wholeheartedly, not enthusiastically.


'met with' ~ had a meeting with; sat down around a table and discussed (a matter) with
'met' ~ saw for the first time; became acquainted with; exchanged introductions with; got to know

CJ

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Thanks a lot CJ Sir.
cat navy 425I would like to know what difference that "with" makes in the meaning of the sentences.1) I met with your students yesterday.2) I met your students yesterday.

It seems to make some difference in American English but, is superfluous in British English. It's one of those examples of the word with being added in AE when it's not needed in BE, like the American visit with compared to the British use of just visit, or cuddle with compared to just cuddle.

Thanks a lot.
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anonymousIt seems to make some difference in American English but, is superfluous in British English.

I consulted with some speakers of British English, and they agreed completely with the contrast between 'met' and 'met with' that I described above.

Emotion: tongue tied

CJ

Thanks a lot CJ Sir. No words to express my gratitude.