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Is the /w/ of "wind" the same sound as the /w/ of "out"?
The reason I ask is that most dictionaries use different
symbols to represent these sounds; the /w/ of "wind"
is shown as a consonant and the /w/ of "out" is shown
as part of the diphthong /ou/. On the other hand, authors
of pronunciation manuals such as Linda Lane ("Focus on
pronunciation") or Ann Baker and Sharon Goldstein
("Pronunciation pairs") transcribe "wind" and "out"
with the same symbol /w/. It all seems a little inconsistent
to me. Can anybody help out?
Darek
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I have to agree with "Guest". Although there definitely is a "w" sound in out, it should have its own classification. The "w" in wind is a consonant sound, but the pronunciation of "out" falls under vowels sounds /au/. Same goes for "cloud, mouth, account, pronounce, town, shower, etc".
Comments  
By sound, the w in wind and the w "ou" sound are essentially the same. Physically, "ou" is one sound, but the second part of it is "w", so in your case, yes.
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Hi King. Thanks for the reply. Actually, that's what I was hoping to hear.
I'm a teacher of practical phonetics at a Teacher Training College and I'm
writing dialogs based on sounds, i.e. a sound in focus appears in the dialog
as many times as possible. I wasn't sure if I had to write separate texts
for "w" and "ou" or if it is OK to combine the two in one dialog. Good news.
Thanks again.
I would have to disagree. These sounds are very different. They should not be combined into one dialog.

As King stated, these are essentially the same sound, but one stands alone and the other is part of a diphthong - thus they are 2 separate sounds and should not be combined into the same examples. The /w/ when it stands alone is only one mouth movement. The /au/ is a diphthong and is two movements - but only one sound.
 Teacher Eric's reply was promoted to an answer.
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THOSE WORDS HAVE DIFFERENT / U/ SOUNDS. THE "w" OF "WIND"

SOUNDS AS A CONSONANT. THE "w" OF "OUT" SOUNDS LIKE THE

"oo" OF " BOOK".