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On 16 Sep 2004 15:19:36 -0700, R H Draney

(about annoying fellow bus riders with foreign-language sound files)
By the way, this reminds me of the unsavory character in Lil Abner who said something like, "That's the meanest, lowdownest, dirtiest, sneakiest thing a body could do ... so ah think ah'll do it!"
(I think I've mentioned that in AUE a time or three in past years.)
(Bob Cunningham said:)

Which do you suppose would annoy them most: Hungarian, Igbo, Amharic, Cantonese, Hebrew, ... ? They're all there, what there are of them.

Hausa, I think...doesn't it have clicks?...r

My mouse has clicks, but it doesn't annoy me.
(about the sound files for the Handbook of the
International Phonetic Association )
Thanks, Bob. Noticing that Hungarian was available, I downloaded that one and had a listen to a word containing one ... be interested in their take on this sound. Does the word sound like 'hat', 'hot', 'hut', 'hawt, 'haht' or what?

To anyone who is learning Hungarian, it would be well to warn of a trap I remember from a movie line: The heroine and her husband were entertaining VIPs of Hungarian extraction. She wanted to make them feel at home, so she learned to say "To your health" in Hungarian. When she said it at the dinner table, it was met by shocked silence, then by gradual understanding and good humor all around.

It turned out she had learned to say something like "eggashegera", which meant something like "Kiss my ass" or something equally rude. A Hungarian speaker told me years later she should have learned something more like "Ay gay shay gera".
A Hungarian speaker could probably straighten all of this out nicely. What did she really say, and what should she really have said?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Bob Cunningham filted:
Anyway, everyone knows Hebrew was the mother of all languages. Ask any conservative, bible-thumping supporter of George W Bush and his wild-eyed gang of hawks.

Empty out your killfile and someone is bound to come along in the next day or two to mention Sanskrit..r
(about annoying fellow bus riders with foreign-language sound files) By the way, this reminds me of the unsavory character in ... so ah think ah'll do it!" (I think I've mentioned that in AUE a time or three in past years.)

Evil-Eye Fleagle? CDB
Of immediate interest is the fact that the AmE representative is MIMIM.

Professor Peter Ladefoged, the author of the American English piece, says in the Handbook of the International Phonetic Association ... prefer to see AUE accessible to one and all without the necessity to ask for the meanings of esoteric abbreviations.

Speaking as a New Child (oldspeak "Boy"), I have had a lot of fun figuring out these puzzles by watching and, well, puzzling. CDB, still thinkling about some of 'em
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
(about annoying fellow bus riders with foreign-language sound files) By ... that in AUE a time or three in past years.)

Evil-Eye Fleagle? CDB

That's Evil Eye Fleegle, although there are fairly reputable sources (IMDB) that go with your spelling.
Anyway, http://www.lil-abner.com/other.html says it is Fleegle.

There also seems to be some disagreement on how Joe Btfsplk's name is spelled.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
To anyone who is learning Hungarian, it would be well to warn of a trap I remember from a movie ... could probably straighten all of this out nicely. What did she really say, and what should she really have said?

I don't remember there ever having been a Hungarian speaker here,=20 Bob, but I'm obviously in a position to find out the answer,=20 anyway. I'll have to send an e-mail to Belgium, though - no=20 shortage of Hungarian speakers to ask here, of course, but I=20 haven't the language to ask them.
I can do the easy bit, though: 'eg=E9szs=E9g' means 'health' and the=20 conventional toast is either 'eg=E9szs=E9g=E9re' or 'eg=E9szs=E9g=E9dre' - = I=20
think the difference is how many people you're addressing, but I'm=20 not clear on this yet. Since Hungarian is "spelt phonetically",=20 this should make the pronunciation of the last:
('E ge:s Se:g e:d rE) or "eh gace shayg aid reh" if I really must=20 force pure vowels into ugly English diphthongs.
I have no idea what the rude expression might have been, but I'll=20 find out, if possible.
=20
Viszontl=E1t=E1sra,
Mark Barratt
No, indeed - Basque, the mother of all languages, is inexplicably (and suspiciously) absent.

I guess Basque would stand a better chance if anyone knew who its mother or its brothers, sisters, sons, daughters, nephews, nieces, aunts, uncles, or cousins was.

Actually, I was doing some reading on the late linguist and sci.lang regular Larry Trask, after I learned earlier this week that he had died (early this year, I think). Trask was a specialist in Basque, and it seems that he had identified a precursor language (I forget what he called it). Sadly, the earlier language has no known cognates.
Nobody seems to have touched his web site at:

Regards,
Mark Barratt
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
By the way, does anyone ever wonder why I write ... the necessity to ask for the meanings of esoteric abbreviations.

Didn't some fellow go to the trouble of compiling a list of abbreviations, including "AmE", that are in common use in AUE?

I think you're talking about the same fellow who decided a year or three ago that he didn't want to use abbreviations anymore because they aren't fair to the unknown number of readers who don't know the abbreviation list exists, so he spells out, for example, all names of reference works.

By using abbreviations, you can make things difficult for some unknown portion of the readership; by not using them, you shouldn't be making things difficult for anyone.

Incidentally, when I used to work, I had a very sensible procedure that I was asked to follow with respect to abbreviations: The first time you mention , you spell it out. If you're going to use it again in the same write-up, you put an abbreviation in parens after it. For the rest of the write-up you use the abbreviation. If you're not going to use it more than once, you don't need the abbreviation in parens.
That's why when you see, for example, Merriam-Webster's 11th Collegiate Dictionary ( MWCD11 ) in one of my postings, you know I'm going to refer to that dictionary again in the posting using the abbreviation.
And, yes, I get careless sometimes and fail to follow the procedure, but I still honor it with good intentions.

People who say the regulars know all the abbreviations belong in a mailing list rather than a newsgroup that's intended for a general readership.
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