I've come across what to me is a momentous discovery but to others here may be well-known: Sound files are now available for all of the language examples in the Handbook of the International Phonetic Association . See
http://web.uvic.ca/ling/resources/ipa/handbook.htm , where you can download a file for an individual language or you can download the whole schmear in one 93-megabyte file. They're zip files, though, so you have to unzip them before you can listen to them.
The languages in the Handbook don't seem to be
systematically chosen; instead I suspect they represent whatever languages someone has submitted a paper about to the Journal of the IPA . For example, there's American English but no British English; Catalan, Galician, and Portuguese but no Spanish; Czech and Croatian but no Russian; and Swedish but no Norwegian.
As far as it goes, though, it looks like it should be a fun toy for us linguistics dilettantes.

Bob Cunningham, Southern California, USofA
Down with Miss Thistlebottom!
Let's hear it for "like" as a conjuction!
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Bob Cunningham filted:
I've come across what to me is a momentous discovery but to others here may be well-known: Sound files are ... in one 93-megabyte file. They're zip files, though, so you have to unzip them before you can listen to them.

Once you've unzipped them, what format are the files in?...if they're MP3 or something similar, I could put a bunch of them on an SD card in my PDA and annoy people on the bus with them..r
On 16 Sep 2004 12:20:26 -0700, R H Draney
Bob Cunningham filted:

I've come across what to me is a momentous discovery ... have to unzip them before you can listen to them.

Once you've unzipped them, what format are the files in?

WAV.
...if they're MP3 or something similar, I could put a bunch of them on an SD card in my PDA and annoy people on the bus with them..r

Which do you suppose would annoy them most: Hungarian, Igbo, Amharic, Cantonese, Hebrew, ... ? They're all there, what there are of them.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I've come across what to me is a momentous discovery but to others here may be well-known: Sound files are ... Norwegian. As far as it goes, though, it looks like it should be a fun toy for us linguistics dilettantes.

Of immediate interest is the fact that the AmE representative is MIMIM.
I've come across what to me is a momentous discovery but to others here may be well-known: Sound files are ... them before you can listen to them. The languages in the Handbook don't seem to be systematically chosen;

No, indeed - Basque, the mother of all languages, is inexplicably (and suspiciously) absent.
instead I suspect they represent whatever languages someone has submitted a paper about to the Journal of the IPA ... Norwegian. As far as it goes, though, it looks like it should be a fun toy for us linguistics dilettantes.

Thanks, Bob. Noticing that Hungarian was available, I downloaded that one and had a listen to a word containing one of the sounds that is giving me the most difficulty - the unaccented Hungarian 'a'. Bizarrely, the files containing the pronunciation of a single word are named for the English translation of that word (doesn't everybody know that 'ketjap' is Dutch for 'soy sauce'?), so to listen to the Hungarian word 'hat', you have to select six.wav.

If anybody is bored enough to do a 2MB download and listen to a 20kB .wav file, I'd be interested in their take on this sound. Does the word sound like 'hat', 'hot', 'hut', 'hawt, 'haht' or what?

Regards,
Mark Barratt
Bob Cunningham filted:
Once you've unzipped them, what format are the files in?

WAV.

Drat...that means some time spent converting them...on the plus side, it means they'll be under ten meg in MP3 format..
...if they're MP3 or something similar, I could put a ... my PDA and annoy people on the bus with them..r

Which do you suppose would annoy them most: Hungarian, Igbo, Amharic, Cantonese, Hebrew, ... ? They're all there, what there are of them.

Hausa, I think...doesn't it have clicks?...r
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(about sound files for the speech examples in the Handbook of the International Phonetic Association )
Of immediate interest is the fact that the AmE representative is MIMIM.

Professor Peter Ladefoged, the author of the American English piece, says in the Handbook of the International Phonetic Association (1999 edition page 41)
The speech in the recording on which the
transcription is based is that of a 21-year-old
speaker who has lived all her life in Southern
California.
He goes on to say
Speakers from other parts of the United States,
such as the East coast and the Northern cities
of the Mid-West have different dialects, nearly
all of them being more conservative, with a
greater number of vowels.
About "all her life": the student may be forgiven for strenuously objecting, "Not yet!" (Thanks to Montagu C Butler in Step by Step in Esperanto , and possibly to generations of jokesters before him.)
By the way, does anyone ever wonder why I write "American English" in full instead of writing "AmE"? It smacks of inness (cliquishness), and I greatly dislike inness. But I respect the right of anyone who wants to be cliquish to be so. I prefer to see AUE accessible to one and all without the necessity to ask for the meanings of esoteric
abbreviations.
The languages in the Handbook don't seem to be systematically chosen;

No, indeed - Basque, the mother of all languages, is inexplicably (and suspiciously) absent.

I guess Basque would stand a better chance if anyone knew who its mother or its brothers, sisters, sons, daughters, nephews, nieces, aunts, uncles, or cousins was.
(I hate it, but I'm afraid "was" is right. But if anyone wants to argue about it, I will listen sympathetically.)

Anyway, everyone knows Hebrew was the mother of all languages. Ask any conservative, bible-thumping supporter of George W Bush and his wild-eyed gang of hawks.
I'm sure Adam and Eve spoke Hebrew. I'm not sure about the snake; I think there must have been an interpreter who isn't mentioned in Genesis.
By the way, does anyone ever wonder why I write "American English" in full instead of writing "AmE"? It smacks ... prefer to see AUE accessible to one and all without the necessity to ask for the meanings of esoteric abbreviations.

Didn't some fellow go to the trouble of compiling a list of abbreviations, including "AmE", that are in common use in AUE?
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