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" Summarising Oakeshott in this way is bound to make him sound a hothouse English plant . "

Is it typical British usage to use only sound here ?

Why not " ....to make him sound like a hothouse English plant . " ?
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Hello Nayeem

I'm not sure about what your sentence means exactly, but I think 'sound' (if it is used as a verb) should be followed by , not directly by , be it AmE or BrE.

paco
Certainly in BrE it would be "sound like".
to make him sound a hothouse English plant


This sounds likethe poor chap is a plant doctor, and trying to listen to a plant's chest! Emotion: smile
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It certainly sounds strange to me.

MrP
Have you ever listened to the chest of a hothouse English plant Mr. P. (whatever is a "hothouse English plant??) It is indeed a very strange experience.
Can't we allow this construction as a literary device forming a parallel with "appear", "seem", and perhaps others, or do you feel that these, too, always require "like"?

It makes him seem an idiot. (?)
It makes him appear a fool. (?)

CJ
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All my life I've hearing " sounds like " . Obviousl , I was a bit surprised to see
that type of sentence construction in the Economist magazine . I thought it
was typical British English then .

Should I presume that both sounds like and sound like are acceptable in the sentence given before ?
Oakeshott was a conservative British philosopher . A hothouse English plant is a plant which grows very quickly inside the hothouse .

The hothouse children are those children who were protected by their rich parents since their birth from the harsh realities of life .
Hi Jim,
Can't we allow this construction as a literary device forming a parallel with "appear", "seem", and perhaps others, or do you feel that these, too, always require "like"?

It makes him seem an idiot. (?)
It makes him appear a fool. (?)


On reflection I think you are correct here, though I still find that this particulr sentence sounds strange. Maybe it is something to do with the adjectives; too many? not enough? wrong order?

"It makes him sound an idiot."
hothouse English plant


I was questioning the adjective order here, nayeem. I think it should be "English hothouse plant", though I still don't know quite what that is. I am familiar with English plants, and with hothouse plants, but have been unable to find a definition for or description of a "hothouse English plant".

A wild guess:
a hothouse plant: a rare and wonderful flower that has to be taken care of, fragile, fearing cold temp's.
an English hothouse plant: a luscious English belle?
Some wouldn't mind listening to her chest, bu no wonder you have never tried, Abbie...
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