Okay, first let me say that I found this newsgroup today and have truly enjoyed reading former conversations.
As a substitute teacher in the American Public School system, I can hardly believe the mangling allowed of our Language by teachers, students, and text-books.
Hopefully, I will be capable of holding my own in this forum :-)
Okay, the problem is this.
I recently substitute taught for a Content Mastery teacher. Basically a full-time tutor. I was assisting a child in answering some basic "Summarize the Story" type questions. The child answered the question "What did the fox have in his mouth?" with the response "Sox." I spoke up and suggested that he look back through the story for the correct spelling of "socks." Little did I know, the story actually used the spelling "sox."
Am I the only one who finds this profoundly disturbing?

-Joe
P.S. Does the period go inside or outside of the quotation marks when they complete a sentence but are not a spoken quote?

Outside of a dog,
Books are man's best friend.
Inside a dog,
It's too dark to read.
-Grouch Marx
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I recently substitute taught for a Content Mastery teacher. Basically a full-time tutor. I was assisting a child in answering ... did I know, the story actually used the spelling "sox." Am I the only one who finds this profoundly disturbing?

I can't answer that. I personally am hardly disturbed by it at all. Several reputable dictionaries indicate that "sox" is an acceptable alternative plural for "sock" in the sense of a soft garment worn over foot and ankle. I myself prefer "socks," but especially when you are rhyming with "fox" it's hard to avoid the attraction of "sox."
I used to read Dr. Seuss's Fox in Sox* to my kids, but I don't recall that the fox ever put the sox/socks in his mouth. So I checked the title of the Suess book at Amazon.com, and lo it's actually *Fox in Socks. It appears you're working with a different book. Live and learn.
P.S. Does the period go inside or outside of the quotation marks when they complete a sentence but are not a spoken quote?

If you are, as appears, a Texan, I'd recommend following American practice, which is to put the period inside the closing quotation mark in every case except when that could cause a serious problem in some technical context, such as computer syntax. British practice is otherwise, but we don't insist that everyone follow the same convention in matters such as that.

Bob Lieblich
Sox it to me
I can't answer that. I personally am hardly disturbed by it at all. Several reputable dictionaries indicate that "sox" is ... I myself prefer "socks," but especially when you are rhyming with "fox" it's hard to avoid the attraction of "sox."

That sent me off to the dictionary, and to my surprise, AHD cites it without copmment.
sock (sok) noun 1. plural socks or sox (soks). A short stocking reaching a point between the ankle and the knee.

The derivation is given as:
(Middle English socke, from Old English socc, a kind of light shoe, from Latin soccus, possibly from Greek sunkhis, sukkhos, Phyrgian shoe.)

So... if it's already made the journey from "soccus" to "socc" to "socks" why shouldn't "sox" be acceptable? I wouldn't spell it that way myself, but I find it far less than profoundly disturbing.
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Little did I know, the story actually used the spelling "sox." Am I the only one who finds this profoundly disturbing?

Perhaps, I have stopped marvelling at the stupidity of humans.
Marc Lombart 30/11/2003 22:04:41 http://www.marcmywords.com

'Bother!' said Pooh, as he uncovered a hive of Smurfs.
Little did I know, the story actually used the spelling "sox." Am I the only one who finds this profoundly disturbing?

Perhaps, I have stopped marvelling at the stupidity of humans.

And perhaps, you haven't?
Wow. I never would have imagined that to be correct.

Thanks ya'll (yes, I am Texan),
Joe
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I am surprised, too.
Are there any other -ock or -ck words that can have an -x plural? Alan
I recently substitute taught for a Content Mastery teacher. Basically a full-time tutor. I was assisting a child in answering ... did I know, the story actually used the spelling "sox." Am I the only one who finds this profoundly disturbing?

It is no less disturbing that a teacher would start work with a student on a specified text without
first reading that text.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs (Ottawa, Canada)
Substitute teachers are often thrown into the deep end with no prior knowledge of what the class has been reading.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
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