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Perhaps the confusion arose over whether "rr" was ever considered ... like unlike "ch" and "ll", which often still do.

But it would still be apparent from in-depth alphabetization that it was a separate letter. That is, the sequence "pero, perro, persona" would be alphabetized in that order if "rr" was not a letter, but "pero, persona, perro" if it was.

Spanish is not my strongest language, but a thought:

The existence of a letter rr* would not necessarily prevent the occurrence of a double *r, would it?
Spanish is not my strongest language, but a thought: The existence of a letter rr* would not necessarily prevent the occurrence of a double *r, would it?

I imagine that the situation would very rarely, if ever, come up. (Javi will have to correct me if I'm wrong).
The reason:
The primary reason you would see 2 **** in a row (rather than the single letter rr* (assuming it exists)) would be when you're combining a word ending in *r* with a word starting with *r* to form a compound. But, (tricky, tricky!) the *r* starting the second word is already pronounced *rr*, so the new compound would need the letter *rr* to represent the same sound. But *r* followed by *rr* (as pronounced) is simply *rr*, so you'd simply write *rr and be done with it.
On a side note, the "big" (not really) Spanish-English dictionary I used in high school (Cassell's Spanish Dictionary, Funk & Wagnalls, 1968), is terribly inconsistent about alphabetizing "ll", "ch", and "rr" as separate letters.
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Isn't it "Sandidge" OSLT back in the UK?

Is it? I have no reason to think so. It doesn't say so on the web site of the Town of Sandwich (www.open-sandwich.co.uk), or if it does I can't find it.

I pronounce the word "sandwich" as /'samwIdZ/, but I'm from a long way from Kent.
How's "Ipswich" pronounced in Mass.? At some point these w's got reintroduced, so to say.

As it's spelled. And I have no reason to suppose these w's were ever disintroduced, so to say.

Ipswich, Suffolk, is usually /IpswItS/, I think. (I suppose the local pronunciation might be different.) Unlike Norwich (/nA.rIdZ/ or /nA.rItS/), the is pronounced.
Massachusetts is pretty conservative with respect to oddly-spelled British place names (Worcester, Gloucester, Leicester, at least, though the Massachusetts Leominster might be difference from the English one); I'd be surprised to find that this was so for some town names byt not others.

The English Leominster is /'[email protected]/.
Jonathan
Massachusetts is pretty conservative with respect to oddly-spelled British place ... this was so for some town names byt not others.

The English Leominster is /'[email protected]/.

All right then; the Massachusetts Leominster is three syllables: /'[email protected]/.
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
Norwich, Vermont, was historically /nOrItS/ FWIU, but is being supplanted by /nOrwItS/. I figured the same sort of thing was true of other -wich place names in New England, with "Greenwich" being a curious holdout, but now I don't know.
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There are also no words beginning with 'w' and the only one I know whichis not a proper name is ... from Sandwich, Massachusetts where a squad car labeled "Sandwich Police" drove by. I wonder if R F works for them.

How is/was "Sandwich" pronounced in Massachusetts "Sanditch"?

I thought it was the same as "sandwich", but I am not sure where the announcer was from.

Have it on tape. Will try and get you a copy if I can find it.