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When do I use the go or goes in the following sentences:

A special thanks goes/go to ....

A special thank you goes/go to .....

I know I can exclude the goes/ go part and say special thanka to..

But is there a difference for the use of goes or go? Or are they both the same here? Please help
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AnonymousBut is there a difference for the use of goes or go? Or are they both the same here?
They are both the same there. An argument can be made for the correctness of both.
Ok, thanks. And that would be the same case if I started the sentence without 'A'? as in:

Special thanks goes/go to ....

so they are the same here and an argument can be made for the correctness of both. Right?

Thank you.
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Anonymous if I started the sentence without 'A'?
No; then the plural verb is a necessity: there is no more grammatical ambiguity without 'a'.
Just to make sure that I got what you explained.

A special thanks 'goes or go' to... Either one can be used here since there is ambiguity.

Special thanks 'go' to... Only go is correct here.

Am I right? I am asking again because I am not sure about the grammatical language when it come to using them for explanations.

Thank you very much for this amazing lesson!
AnonymousA special thanks 'goes or go' to... Either one can be used here since there is ambiguity. Special thanks 'go' to... Only go is correct here.Am I right?
That's how I perceive the notional S-V concord, yes.

'A' + 'thanks' creates an ambiguity which opens the possibility for either a singular or a plural verb form, but 'thanks' alone is clearly plural.
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Great!

That brings up one more question. If the singular verb was used in the sentence starting with the 'A', should I thank only one person or area?

Finally, what if I started the sentence with: special thank you (instead of special thanks)?
Anonymous If the singular verb was used in the sentence starting with the 'A', should I thank only one person or area?
No, that is not necessary.
AnonymousFinally, what if I started the sentence with: special thank you (instead of special thanks)?
Then I would use 'A special thank-you'.
Does the same idea of ambiguity apply to 'A special thank you', in which both singular and plural verbs can be used?

Many thanks!
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