Hello,

Can you find any mistakes in the below text?
Text of The Queen's speech at the Blackhead's House in Riga, Latvia, 18 October 2006

Madam President,

Thank you for your words of welcome and for your generous hospitality in this splendid setting, a building which was destroyed in World War II and only recently rebuilt and as such it embodies the renaissance of your country.

I am delighted to be visiting Latvia for the first time. This visit symbolises not only the renewal of the partnership between our two countries in the last fifteen years but the longstanding relationship between Britain and Latvia - and in particular between Britain and Riga - which has been important to us both for several centuries.

It is worth recalling just how close that relationship has been. This time last year Britain celebrated the two hundredth anniversary of the Royal Navy's victory at the Battle of Trafalgar, arguably one of the most decisive battles in our nation's history. British ships at that time were waterproofed with pitch from Riga, rigged with ropes of hemp from Riga, and their masts were of pine from Riga. It is hardly surprising that Napoleon is alleged to have called this city "a suburb of London". British merchants were well-established here in the 19th Century. The Anglican Church here testifies to a prosperous and civic-minded British community in Riga at that time. George Armitstead, the very successful Mayor of Riga whose statue I shall unveil later today, was descended from a Yorkshire vicar. Almost exactly 87 years ago, British sailors were killed whilst supporting the forces fighting for a free Latvia.

Madam President, nobody here needs reminding just how much the people of Latvia suffered from 1940 to 1991. So many individuals lost their lives and whole communities were destroyed under the successive occupations by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. A thriving Jewish community was almost completely wiped out in the Holocaust. Thousands of Latvians had to endure deportation and appalling conditions in Stalin's Gulag. Others, including you, Madam President, spent long years in exile. In overcoming that legacy, the achievements of the inhabitants of Latvia since the renewal of independence have been remarkable. Who could have imagined 15 years ago that Latvia would by now be a member of the European Union and hosting a NATO Summit in a few weeks from now? In a sense, Britain's growing relationship with Latvia and indeed with all the Baltic States, has felt like the happy rediscovery of a long lost but much valued member of the family.

In NATO we are grateful to Latvian soldiers serving alongside our forces and those of other allies in Afghanistan and Iraq. In the EU also we often find ourselves on the same side of the negotiating table. Riga, like London, has long been a great city of trade - a meeting place of cultures and ideas which has enriched not just Latvia but Europe. Your economy has made enormous progress since 1991, and the pace of growth since you joined the European Union in 2004 has been dramatic - the fastest in the EU. British investors are starting to find a home here and new contacts are being made constantly. I was interested to learn that the First Minister of Wales will lead a business delegation here next week.

In this globalised world, countries like ours know that we must draw on the talents of all our peoples, especially the young, if we are to thrive. I am pleased that so many young Latvians come to Britain to study and to work, and we hope that the knowledge and skills they acquire will be used to benefit Latvia in future years. As travel and tourism in both directions grow, we hope that British visitors will explore Latvia's rich cultural heritage, and that Latvians will learn more about modern Britain - about our diverse society; about our strong and stable economy; and about our technology, our innovations, and our thriving arts scene.

Madam President, Latvia has overcome many challenges since it regained its independence and I am pleased that the United Kingdom has been one of the countries to assist you along the way. As Latvia has grown in strength and confidence, so has our partnership. I am confident that our friendship will continue to deepen and that our two peoples will build an ever broader and stronger bridge between us.

I have much pleasure in asking you all to rise and drink a toast -

To the President and People of the Republic of Latvia.

Source: www.royal.gov.uk

Hi,

You're asking me to try to find the Queen's mistakes? Hmmmm, five hundred years ago this would have cost me my head!

Best wishes, Clive

PS - I believe it was you who recently accused me of thinking I was better than a Nobel Prize winner for trying to do this kind of thing. To my surprise and regret, no-one called this year to offer me a Nobel prize for Literature. Instead, they gave it to some other guy. I await your similar condemnation for presuming to look for errors in the Queen's words.

Text of The Queen's speech at the Blackhead's House in Riga, Latvia, 18 October 2006



Madam President,

Thank you for your words of welcome and for your generous hospitality in this splendid setting, a building which was destroyed in World War II and only recently rebuilt and as such embodies the renaissance of your country.

I am delighted to be visiting Latvia for the first time. This visit symbolises not only the renewal of the partnership between our two countries in the last fifteen years but the longstanding relationship between Britain and Latvia - and in particular between Britain and Riga - which has been important to us both for several centuries.

It is worth recalling just how close that relationship has been. This time last year Britain celebrated the two hundredth anniversary of the Royal Navy's victory at the Battle of Trafalgar, arguably one of the most decisive battles in our nation's history. British ships at that time were waterproofed with pitch from Riga, rigged with ropes of hemp from Riga, and had masts that were of pine from Riga. It is hardly surprising that Napoleon is alleged to have called this city "a suburb of London". British merchants were well-established here in the 19th Century. The Anglican Church here testifies to a prosperous and civic-minded British community in Riga at that time. George Armitstead, the very successful Mayor of Riga whose statue I shall unveil later today, was descended from a Yorkshire vicar. Almost exactly 87 years ago, British sailors were killed whilst supporting the forces fighting for a free Latvia.

Madam President, nobody here needs reminding just how much the people of Latvia suffered from 1940 to 1991. So many individuals lost their lives and whole communities were destroyed under the successive occupations by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. A thriving Jewish community was almost completely wiped out in the Holocaust. Thousands of Latvians had to endure deportation and appalling conditions in Stalin's Gulag. Others, including you, Madam President, spent long years in exile. In overcoming that legacy, the achievements of the inhabitants of Latvia since the renewal of independence have been remarkable. Who could have imagined 15 years ago that Latvia would by now be a member of the European Union and hosting a NATO Summit in a few weeks from now? In a sense, Britain's growing relationship with Latvia, and indeed with all the Baltic States, has felt like the happy rediscovery of a long lost but much valued member of the family.

In NATO we are grateful to Latvian soldiers serving alongside our forces and those of other allies in Afghanistan and Iraq. In the EU also we often find ourselves on the same side of the negotiating table. Riga, like London, has long been a great city of trade - a meeting place of cultures and ideas which has enriched not just Latvia but Europe. Your economy has made enormous progress since 1991, and the pace of growth since you joined the European Union in 2004 has been dramatic - the fastest in the EU. British investors are starting to find a home here and new contacts are being made constantly. I was interested to learn that the First Minister of Wales will lead a business delegation here next week.


In this globalised world, countries like ours know that we must draw on the talents of all our peoples, especially the young, if we are to thrive. I am pleased that so many young Latvians come to Britain to study and to work, and we hope that the knowledge and skills they acquire will be used to benefit Latvia in future years. As travel and tourism in both directions grow, we hope that British visitors will explore Latvia's rich cultural heritage, and that Latvians will learn more about modern Britain - about our diverse society; about our strong and stable economy; and about our technology, our innovations, and our thriving arts scene.

Madam President, Latvia has overcome many challenges since it regained its independence and I am pleased that the United Kingdom has been one of the countries to assist you along the way. As Latvia has grown in strength and confidence, so has our partnership. I am confident that our friendship will continue to deepen and that our two peoples will build an ever broader and stronger bridge between us.

I have much pleasure in asking you all to rise and drink a toast -

To the President and People of the Republic of Latvia.



Of course, the Queen has a speech-writer, so I doubt very much that these are actually her own words. Emotion: big smile
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hi nona the brit,

That's correct. Of course, had Her Majesty written something herself, it would have been a much better text.

Englishuser
Hi Clive,

It is very obvious that H.M. The Queen of Canada is a very good writer and public speaker. There were some mistakes in Her Majesty's speech to the President and people of Latvia, but those were made by staff of Her Majesty's Private Secretary's office. When The Queen made the speech, the President of Latvia got to listen to English par excellence.

Englishuser