Hi Folks,
In the States, especially in the South, ‘sooee' is used for calling pigs.
Does anyone know if there is a standardized spelling for this? I see mostly sooee and soo-ee. I also see questions about whether it's pronounced soo-ee or soo-ey.
And, do folks in the UK also use this for calling pigs?

Thanks,
Jeremy >-)
In the States, especially in the South, ‘sooee' is used for calling pigs. Does anyone know if there is a ... questions about whether it's pronounced soo-ee or soo-ey. And, do folks in the UK also use this for calling pigs?

It's "Hooey" over here, at least according to P.G.Wodehouse. I suspect that it varies regionally; calls used with cattle certainly do.

Don Aitken
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It's "Hooey" over here, at least according to P.G.Wodehouse. I suspect that it varies regionally; calls used with cattle certainly do.

PGW's "hooey" was an American import into Shropshire.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hi Folks, In the States, especially in the South, ?sooee' is used for calling pigs.

Calling pigs ... Sooee, with a rising pitch. My grandmother taught me how to make the sound.
Your message brings back fond memories from about forty-five years ago. I'm writing this with tears in my eyes. I hadn't thought of sooee for decades. Why would I?
I remember hauling the slop bucket out to the pigs. That five-gallon pail was pretty heavy for a little boy. I can't imagine why anyone would call pigs today. I'm sure it has nothing to do with a slop bucket, though.
Well, I took a break and calmed down. I didn't know AUE could be this intense. I'm my (stodgy) self again.
My grandmother didn't teach me how to spell the word, Jeremy, but I like "sooee." In further answer to your question about the history of the word, my grandparents were Norwegians, and my memories were of South Dakota.
I don't know what you mean about the difference between soo-ee and soo-ey. My description of how the sound was made (with a rising pitch) isn't quite accurate, but I'm not going to let old Stodgy edit it. Writing this message meant a lot to me. Thank you for reading it.

Mike Bandy
I remember hauling the slop bucket out to the pigs. That five-gallon pail was pretty heavy for a little boy. I can't imagine why anyone would call pigs today. I'm sure it has nothing to do with a slop bucket, though.

My pigs never needed calling: all you had to do was look slightly as though you might have food about your person.
Writing this message meant a lot to me. Thank you for reading it.

I liked reading it. And anyhow, we swineherds we divine swineherds, as Homer knew us to be must stick together.

Mike.