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Hello,

1) When a dog is old but still runs around happily, you can say that 'he or she's got a spring in her step'. Is there perhaps a similar expression that could be used instead?

2) Also, when talking about a dog, are the words 'trot', 'scuttle' or 'pad' appropriate?

"Look at Lucy trotting along happily."

"Look at Lucy scuttling along happily."

"Look at Lucy padding along happily:"

And do any other verbs spring to mind?

Thank you.

Comments  
Ann2251) When a dog is old but still runs around happily, you can say that 'he or she's got a spring in her step'. Is there perhaps a similar expression that could be used instead?

Yes, but if you mean that she is far from decrepit despite her age, you need to add "still": "She's still got a spring in her step." There are lots of ways to express that sort of thing, limited only by your imagination and your vocabulary. We use "spry" for old people with youthful vigor, sort of a left-handed compliment, if you ask me. You can be young at heart. You can be younger than your years.

Ann2252) Also, when talking about a dog, are the words 'trot', 'scuttle' or 'pad' appropriate?

Yes, if that's what you mean. You can use any word you might use for a person or any animal moving along the ground, maybe lope, swing, bound, run.

Thank you for your help!

I’ve even thought of two more alternatives since I posted the question.