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1."Take a rest, Felicia, you don't need to get all the firewood stacked today."
2."Take a rest, Felicia, you don't need to stack all the firewood today."
What is the difference in meaning between the two examples? Can I use them interchangeably for the same meaning?

Source: please refer to example #7

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roky0071What is the difference in meaning between the two examples?

No difference.

roky0071Can I use them interchangeably for the same meaning?

Yes.

roky0071Source: please refer to example #7

???

CJ

Comments  
roky0071Take a rest,

While this is possible, it's also a little wordy. Many native speakers of other languages tend to say that while many native English speakers just say rest.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
anonymousMany native speakers of other languages tend to say that while many native English speakers just say rest.

It would sound odd in my Middle Atlantic dialect, and I daresay in US English, to say "Rest, Felicia. You don't need to get all the firewood stacked today." And truth be told, "take a rest" is only a little less odd. If we use "take", it's "take a break" or "take five".

1."Take a rest, Felicia, you don't need to get all the firewood stacked today."
2."Take a rest, Felicia, you don't need to stack all the firewood today."

Between the two examples above, which one emphasize the process and the end state? And why? Please explain

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