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1. Ensuring you stand out from among other candidates is critical.

2. Ensuring you stand out from other candidates is critical.

3. Do you want to stand out from the crowd, maximise your potential to get a good degree and increase your job potential?

4. Do you want to stand out from among the crowd, maximise your potential to get a good degree and increase your job potential?

Which of the above sentences is not acceptable? Why not?
Comments  
I don't recognize 'stand out from among'.

'Stand out from' or 'stand out among', but not 'stand out from among'.

Someone else can handle the 'why'.
I rather agree with Dave. But I don't think "from among" is grammatically incorrect. "From" can be followed by another preposition indicating a place. (EX) "Suddenly a rabbit burst out from beneath the trees" (EX) The deer started from amidst the entangled fern. Probably we might use "stand out in X", "stand out among X" or even "stand out from among X", but the quotes in OED are only for "stand out from X".

paco
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Hi guys,

I look at it this way. You can only stand out from a group that you are, in some manner, part of or related to, ie among.

For example, a student can stand out from the other students. However, he/she can't really be said to stand out from a group of astronauts, because he is not part of (ie among) that group.

The preposition 'among' is thus redundant.

Best wishes, Clive
CliveThe preposition 'among' is thus redundant.

My feeling, exactly.
Hello

I have no intention to oppose Clive's opinion. But somehow I feel John is still a member of our class when we say "John is an outstanding student in our class".

paco
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Hi Paco,

I didn't mean to suggest that the person was no longer part of the group. You can only stand out from a group that you are, in some manner, part of.

Consider the image of a man who is 2 metres tall, in a group of people. He will, literally, stand out from the group, but he will still be part of it.

Best wishes, Clive
CliveI didn't mean to suggest that the person was no longer part of the group. You can only stand out from a group that you are, in some manner, part of.

Consider the image of a man who is 2 metres tall, in a group of people. He will, literally, stand out from the group, but he will still be part of it.I see! Now I understand what you meant. Thanks.

paco
TeoDo you want to stand out from among the crowd, maximise your potential to get a good degree and increase your job potential?
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