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Hi guys,Please could somebody clarify whether my understanding of the below is correct:Stand up = e.g. telling somebody to stand upStand-up = a form of comedySit down/Sit-down = these essentially both mean the same thing e.g. sit down on a sofaSit-up = a form of exercise I very much look forward to hearing peoples responses!
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I apologise for the format above as it changed when I posted the message!

Also, I forgot to add 'sit up' = e.g. please sit up straight
Andyw12345Hi guys,Please could somebody clarify whether my understanding of the below is correct:Stand up = e.g. telling somebody to stand upStand-up = a form of comedySit down/Sit-down = these essentially both mean the same thing e.g. sit down on a sofaSit-up = a form of exercise I very much look forward to hearing peoples responses!

The way you have typed your examples so close together makes it difficut for me to determine exactly what you want to know. I'll try the following.

stand up = rise to one's feet

stand-up = a form of comedian (stands in front of the audience and tells short jokes)

sit down = rest one's bottom on a chair;

sit-down = a stoppage of work, like a walk-out; I think some use it simply as a break from work to rest a while

sit-up = a form of exercise to strengthen the abs and the lower back
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Hi Philip,
Thanks for your response and I do apologise for the strange format of my first post.Your answers here are most helpful.

One last question, is 'sit up' different to 'sit-up'?
I very much look forward to hearing back from you.
Sit-up - an excercise to strengthen stomach muscles

sit up - an instruction to someone who is already sitting that they should sit with good posture and stop slouching (the sort of thing parents and teachers say to kids)
Thanks Nona :-)
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Note that the forms without hyphens are verbs: stand up, sit up, etc.
The forms with hyphens are nouns or adjectives: stand-up, sit-up, etc.
CJ
Thanks CalifJim, this may sound stupid, but could you explain the difference between verbs and nouns/adjectives?
Nouns are words that refer to something. car, desk, butter, person, rock, vinegar, pencil, pin, love, virtue, paper, book, ... They are most frequently used with articles a, an, the, or possessive adjectives. a car, my desk, the butter, a person, the rock, ...

Adjectives are words that describe or limit nouns. red, old, open, tall, hard, sharp, ... as in a red car, my old friend, a tall person, an open door, a hard rock, ...
Verbs are words that express actions or states. throw, sing, bounce, rip, find, make, do, toss, give, bring, carry, break, ...
CJ
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