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Hi,

Can I say that something I learnt didn’t stand the test of time if I forgot it?

“I took a course in accounting last year, but the stuff I learnt there didn’t exactly stand the test of time. I can recall very few takeaway points.”

If not, is there perhaps a different phrase that’d fit the situation?

Thank you so much.

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Ann225Can I say that something I learnt didn’t stand the test of time if I forgot it?

Not really. It's your memory that's at fault in that case, not what you've learned.

Ann225If not, is there perhaps a different phrase that’d fit the situation?

See below, for example.

Ann225“I took a course in accounting last year, but the stuff I learnt there didn’t exactly stick in my mind. stand the test of time. I can recall very few takeaway points.”
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Ann225Can I say that something I learnt didn’t stand the test of time if I forgot it?

No. "stand the test of time" is used in cases where the amount of time is considerably more than is involved in forgetting something.

If something stands the test of time, it remains useful or valued for a very long time.

Pop music comes and goes, but classical music has stood the test of time.
Many people will be wary of the peace settlement until it has stood the test of time.
It says a lot for Julia Child's cooking skills that so many of her recipes have stood the test of time.

CJ

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  

‘Stick in my mind’ isn’t exactly what I was going for, but thank you anyway.

I think that time also plays a role in people forgetting things and that’s what I was trying to say. I suppose English doesn’t have the kind of expression I need.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Ann225I suppose English doesn’t have the kind of expression I need.

It will after you make a good one up.