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I'm intrigued. On another forum, Mr P mentioned of the term "standard spoken English". He hasn't yet given a clear definition of what he means by that term, but he has excluded the use of "if I have/get chance..." over "if I have/get the/a chance..." from his view of what is standard spoken English.

I wonder, what do you all think the term "standard spoken English" means and would you, as Mr P did, exclude the above? And these, would you exclude from spoken standard English's borders?

-Things going well, are they?
-He won't be late I don't think.
-She about six foot tall.
-wanna/gonna
-Jamie, he's got a new hat.
-He's got a new hat, Jamie.
-There's a hairy thing on the green stuff.
-Dave coffee?
-He got killed.
-I was worried I was going to lose it and I did almost.
-You know which one I mean probably.
-A friend of mine, his uncle had the taxi firm when we had the wedding.
-Do you know erm you know where the erm go over to er go over erm where the fire station is not the one that white white...
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Comments  (Page 2) 

Really?

Note:

In the build-up to the event, the St Catharine's students will be learning the principles of Arabic chant, in particular the "Ison" - the drone which hums underneath the central melody. The Lebanese choristers will also have chance to practice the English tradition. By putting them side by side, the two choirs will try to tease out the similarities and see how easily each tradition adapts to coping with the other.
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The 15-minute sessions will run at the following times: 1130, 1200, 1230, 1300, 1400, 1430, 1500, 1530. To attend one of the sessions, people should make sure they book in as soon as they arrive, as places are limited. People will also have chance to take photos so don't forget to bring cameras.

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Interesting:

This also gives us chance to cover any design concerns before the fit out.

Our philosophy is to be honest and up front – we will tell you if we think something is a "waste of money"! If you have chance to draw any rough sketches, this can be very useful in starting the ball rolling.

Please note that it may be some time before we have chance to respond messages that are sent to us and sorry but we cannot guarantee a reply in every instance.

"England football captain Beckham, speaking from his home in Spain, revealed he did not get chance to see the game as he was with his Real Madrid team-mates."

'Before I get chance to reply she says: "Come on then, get your board on." I slip away, and head for the slope that leads back down to the lift with Lesley hot on my tail. I put in some turns and feel my pace quickening in line with my heart.'

"And the rules of the final mean that no one will get chance to warm up on the apparatus before they get to perform their routine."

A Home Office spokesman said last night: "Our starting point will be that all criminal gains should be removed from offenders. For example those criminals buying commodities to avoid the circulation of cash could have their assets seized before they have chance to disperse them.

Is say Mr P needs to listen more.

Did I hear a "Baa-baa!" in here?
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No, but you'll hear a "yawn" here. You enjoy these discussions with yourself so much - do you really need us to particiapte?
AnonymousDid I hear a "Baa-baa!" in here?
Who knows? I heard more of a "Meow", I think.

CJ
I can't say exactly what kind of spoken English your examples belong to, but I'm sure some of them are quite common in several varieties (for example: He got killed / got used in passive forms). And your She about six foot tall is something I would associate with AAVE (African American Vernacular English)... I think I heard that they can use the singular that way, as in "five mile away", but I am not sure.

Since there is no official standard for spoken English, you should expect some guidelines could be taken from a "de facto" standard. When the vast majority of people, or the most influential ones in a certain community, start to do something in a certain way, a "de facto" standard can be taken into account.
So, a de-facto standard English is the kind of English most people use and find natural.
Now, since it's obvious that not everyone talks the same way as everyone else, or the same way in every situation, you should also expect to find several de-facto standards, and you should expect every standard to consist of several registers.

Since we need to consider de-facto standards for English, we need to consider "frequency". Just because someone says something in a certain way, doesn't mean it is part of a particular standard. You would need to find out that the vast majority of the speakers you want to associate with that particular standard do say it that way as well, or they accept it as natural, as a variant.

Now some examples (made up, just supposing):

If only one person says "Holla back", it's just what they say, and it can't be part of any de-facto standard.
If the vast majority of people aged 14-25 in California either say "holla back" or understand it and consider it common, but in other parts of America it's rare or not used at all, you can't say it's part of de-facto standard American English. You can't say it's standard Californian English either. But you can say it's standard Teenage Californian English, informal register.

As you see, it depends on how specific you want to be about a de-facto standard, and how exactly you want to define and deal with its subtle points.
Just my opinion.
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AnonymousNote:

In the build-up to the event, the St Catharine's students will be learning the principles of Arabic chant, in particular the "Ison" - the drone which hums underneath the central melody. The Lebanese choristers will also have chance to practice the English tradition. By putting them side by side, the two choirs will try to tease out the similarities and see how easily each tradition adapts to coping with the other.

..

I've sent an email to the media contact for this first webpage, to ask for confirmation of the status of "have chance to".

Unfortunately he's out of the office for a few days. But maybe he'll reply on his return.

MrP

<I've sent an email to the media contact for this first webpage, to ask for confirmation of the status of "have chance to".

Unfortunately he's out of the office for a few days. But maybe he'll reply on his return.>

That's great. In the meantime, do you think you could give us your definition of "standard spoken English"?
Hello old chap,
Anonymous
That's great. In the meantime, do you think you could give us your definition of "standard spoken English"?

Standard spoken British English is the form of English in which "to have chance to" is incorrect, but "to have a chance to" is correct.

All the best,

MrP
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AnonymousThat's great. In the meantime, do you think you could give us your definition of "standard spoken English"?
I've given mine. MrP's standard seems to be a common variety, even if maybe he doesn't want to define it precisely. But what's your definition? You never express your opinion, you always ask... lol! I'd like to hear yours.
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