I'd be grateful for US opinions about whether one can start a sentence with "More important,', or if it has to be "More importantly,". In UK English (which is what I usually write) the former is standard, and many people would regard the latter as wrong. Even if I don't find it wrong, I find it sounds odd, and I much prefer "More important,".
However, for a book currently in proof (and for which I need to return the proofs in the next few days), the publishers in their wisdom have decided to "translate" it all into US English. In most respects I'm not too bothered by this, but I'm in two minds about the particular point raised. Does the form without -ly sound as odd to American ears as the form with it does to mine?
athel

Athel Cornish-Bowden
http://bip.cnrs-mrs.fr/bip10/homepage.htm
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I'd be grateful for US opinions about whether one can start a sentence with "More important,', or if it has ... as wrong. Even if I don't find it wrong, I find it sounds odd, and I much prefer "More important,".

What's the whole sentence?
"More important" doesn't sound odd to me (I'm American born & bred). The two forms sound equally normal to my ear.
-Laura
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I'd be grateful for US opinions about whether one can start a sentence with "More important,', or if it has ... Does the form without -ly sound as odd to American ears as the form with it does to mine? athel

I agree with you that "More important," sounds odd. I'm American, and also happen to live in Europe. I see quite a bit of UK to US translation in my work, and I've never seen the "-ly" dropped in this case. Usually it's mostly with "Firstly", "Secondly", etc. that I notice it's dropped.
Does the form without -ly sound as odd to American ears as the form with it does to mine?

What follows? and what's the punctuation? To these American ears, "More important, he got reelected" (see the comma) sounds ghastly.
Athel Cornish-Bowden typed thus:
I'd be grateful for US opinions about whether one can start a sentence with "More important,', or if it has ... raised. Does the form without -ly sound as odd to American ears as the form with it does to mine?

We're going to need the whole sentence.
More important men than you have passed this way.
nothing wrong with that

David
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Athel Cornish-Bowden typed thus:

I'd be grateful for US opinions about whether one can ... American ears as the form with it does to mine?

We're going to need the whole sentence. More important men than you have passed this way. nothing wrong with that

Nope, and that's a good example. It would have been helpful if she'd provided the whole sentence, but she did include a comma in the quotaion marks. The sentence "More important, men have passed this way." doesn't sound right to me. I can't seem to think of an example where it would seem correct with the comma. Just pondering...
Athel Cornish-Bowden typed thus: We're going to need the whole sentence. More important men than you have passed this way. nothing wrong with that

Nope, and that's a good example. It would have been helpful if she'd provided the whole sentence, but she did ... to me. I can't seem to think of an example where it would seem correct with the comma. Just pondering...

Want one?
More important, less important it doesn't matter.

There.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Nope, and that's a good example. It would have been ... where it would seem correct with the comma. Just pondering...

Want one? More important, less important it doesn't matter. There.

Good one!
Thanks.
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