+0
could somebody please tell me when do these verbs (see, feel, smell, tast, understand, ...)appear in a progressive tense?
big thanks before hand.
+0
In English grammar, we do not use ' ing ' with verbs of senses. Once they are used, they can mean other thing.

eg. John is seeing Mary. ( to meet )
1 2
Comments  
TASTE- When we are using our sense of taste to find out something the progressive form can be used.

-"Will you stop eating the chocolate cake, please, it's still hot".
- I'm just tasting it to see if it is ok. (investigating)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
 whl626's reply was promoted to an answer.
Do not use -ing with senses? I disagree.

Consider:

"Did you notice the old fruit at the back of the fridge?"

"Ah ha! That's what I'm smelling."

And:

"Are you tasting the eggplant?", she asked as she watched him carefully lift the spoon to his mouth.

...???
To answer antonio's question, I think that these verbs can be used as usual. However, one should be aware of other meanings such as "He's seeing my sister" as the other poster mentioned.

Examples:

"Are you seeing what I'm seeing?"

"I was feeling pain in my leg before the operation."

"While I was smelling the Christmas cake, the drugs hit me."

"I was tasting the stale brownie for days after I ate it."

"He is quickly understanding what it means to be cursed."
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
That's why sometimes we don't know whether to stick to the rules to a T or make allowance for some manueverings.
I am pretty sure you would definitely make some allowance for some manOeuverings. It's in our nature, isn't it?
But following rules add a touch of class to speechesEmotion: smile. That's why people admire those with crystal clear pronunciation and good grammar
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I couldn't agree more! With a touch of class life is more fun.
Show more